The Track Saw Forum  

Go Back   The Track Saw Forum > The Track Saw Forum > Rant, Rate, Rave & Review

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 01-06-2012, 11:28 PM
Gsharp8 Gsharp8 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: KC
Posts: 56
Default Honest EZ One Assessment

Hey All !

So, to start with, I have used every type tool imaginable..... I'm a gadget freak.

So, I bought an EZ One because the premise seemed perfectly logical.

After putting it together, (an interesting project with zero instructions...) This thing has been a steady flow of "cool".

Today, after talking to Dik in a few messages, I decided to put together a small table top made from Rosewood. This included ripping to the correct width, deciding if I needed to run through the joiner ( or try to use the electric hand planer as Dik had ) join with either biscuits - pocket holes - etc...

I had decided a few days ago to try the Lenox 40 tooth steel blade... the thin kerf blades just had to much flex for me.

So, the blade turned out to work extremely well. I ripped the 2.5" tongue and groove flooring down to 2 1/8" removing all tongue and groove cuts. That cut was by far smooth enough to set in the kreg jig and drill the pocket holes and began putting the top slab together.

(side note)

very cool trick on the rail.... spray the saw base and the track with pledge furniture polish. We learned this years ago with aluminum ladders. super smooth and slick.

I fashioned a type of "jig" out of a simple piece of particle board to make the first cut (to remove the the "tongue")

I then had my stops set for 2 1/8" and used the same board to "pressure" the board into the stops. The result was absolutely perfect 2 1/8" rips of Rosewood. I did have to move the sliding fence to accommodate the length of the particular piece i was working with. All in all this was not only immensely safer that when i do it on the table saw, it was infinitely more "true". Very accurate.

A huge plus after the pieces were all screwed together, planed and sanded... I simply put the entire thing up on the table, upside down so I could see my pocket screws, and trimmed the table edges to perfection. 1/64" off at the corners...... damn good. you could have that margin by just holding your tape measure wrong.... lol

Dino, Dik, Burt, and a few others along the way... BRAVO!!!!!!!

If you are on the fence about this product, and you are serious about doing quality work safely.... FREAKIN JUMP OFF THE FENCE! Best money I've spent in a long time. I will say... do your homework. watch the videos. read lots of post in the forum. Do not hesitate to ask questions of the guys who have pioneered using this thing. they are brilliant. Expect to be confused a little - it takes the willingness to consider that the way you've always done things.... COULD BE INFERIOR. LEARN!!! IT'S WORTH IT.

Greg Gibbs

Last edited by Gsharp8; 01-06-2012 at 11:31 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 01-06-2012, 11:47 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

Greg,

I love reading posts like this one. I'm just amazed at how quiickly you fellows are seeing the beauty of EZ.

I hadn't heard the pledge trick before. I"ve always used "Top Cote" - often used on table saws , joiners, etc. Others use "Johnson Wax". Just make sure it isn't something that stain the wood.

You mentioned "Infinately true". In the past several of us have talked about the difference is working with wood with straigth edges versus working with wood with parallel edges. When a board is properly cut on the EZ it is straight. When you cut it with a table saw, it is possible to have parallel sides that are not straight.

Some of the guys just rip the boards and glue - no joiner or planer. I've done it a few times just to show that it does work.

Have fun!


Burt
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 01-07-2012, 02:31 AM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,253
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Burt View Post
Greg,

I love reading posts like this one. I'm just amazed at how quiickly you fellows are seeing the beauty of EZ.

I hadn't heard the pledge trick before. I"ve always used "Top Cote" - often used on table saws , joiners, etc. Others use "Johnson Wax". Just make sure it isn't something that stain the wood.

You mentioned "Infinately true". In the past several of us have talked about the difference is working with wood with straigth edges versus working with wood with parallel edges. When a board is properly cut on the EZ it is straight. When you cut it with a table saw, it is possible to have parallel sides that are not straight.

Some of the guys just rip the boards and glue - no joiner or planer. I've done it a few times just to show that it does work.

Have fun!


Burt
That's one thing I've noticed using the Ripsizer on lumber, I end up with parallel boards but not necessarily straight. A long track would sometimes be handy just to get a nice straight side to work off of.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 01-07-2012, 02:44 AM
Gsharp8 Gsharp8 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: KC
Posts: 56
Default

Burt, Sean,

so true. That "straight" wood made a "Hu-normous" difference as the top was being put together.

btw, Burt....

I've added a few 3/4" tops to the EZ-One - but am unsure how to secure them so they don't "wiggle around". Any thoughts?

Greg
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 01-07-2012, 02:51 AM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 298
Default

It's cool to see the pledge trick - My ssrk wasn't sliding like I wanted so I sprayed a paper towel with some silicone spray and wiped down the bridge track with it. Smooth as silk now!
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 01-07-2012, 03:42 AM
Mel Beck Mel Beck is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Southern Oregon
Posts: 493
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivanhoe View Post
It's cool to see the pledge trick - My ssrk wasn't sliding like I wanted so I sprayed a paper towel with some silicone spray and wiped down the bridge track with it. Smooth as silk now!
Ivanhoe
Be careful with silicone, it migrates like crazy. Silicone is not allowed in my shop, after some got on a couple of projects and basically ruined them for finishing, could get an even stain. I've been told it can effect glue joints too.
__________________
Mel B.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 01-07-2012, 10:02 AM
sawdust57 sawdust57 is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: morgantown wv
Posts: 217
Default

slikycone is a big no no in a woodshop. mineral spirits won't do a good job at removing it either.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 01-07-2012, 01:13 PM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tulare, CA
Posts: 298
Default

I used it very sparingly (sprayed the area the size of a quarter on a paper towel) and then applied to the raised track portion of the bridge only. It's good to know that it can create problems...Thanks.

I had searched before doing this and didn't come up with anything on the care and feeding of the ez-one/extrusions. Might be something good to add to the knowledge base.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 01-07-2012, 03:28 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gsharp8 View Post
Burt, Sean,

so true. That "straight" wood made a "Hu-normous" difference as the top was being put together.

btw, Burt....

I've added a few 3/4" tops to the EZ-One - but am unsure how to secure them so they don't "wiggle around". Any thoughts?

Greg
Greg,

A Photo would help.

A rabbeted edge will fit in the sides of the SME.

A board laying on the foam beam and across the SSME on the side of the EZ one can be held by putting a block of wood under the board and against the SSME. Then drop a screw into the wood.

Other things can work - just depends on where you are placing the boards.


Burt
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 01-07-2012, 03:32 PM
Burt Burt is offline
Moderator - Cabinet Making
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivanhoe View Post
I used it very sparingly (sprayed the area the size of a quarter on a paper towel) and then applied to the raised track portion of the bridge only. It's good to know that it can create problems...Thanks.

I had searched before doing this and didn't come up with anything on the care and feeding of the ez-one/extrusions. Might be something good to add to the knowledge base.
The "Top Cote" I mentioned is good stuff and made for woodworking tools. I've used it for years and it is good stuff but it is a bit on the expensive side.



Burt
Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
assessment, ez-one, how to, review

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -3. The time now is 09:03 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.