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Old 03-25-2018, 08:21 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Default The $8 PBB

For lack of a better name, I am calling it that. Obviously the bridge and track, and other such cost more. But I have $8 worth of rescued wood-plastic composite decking in place of any aluminum extrusions. Since this decking extrusion has a rectangular web, cutting it in one direction or the other creates t-slots either on top, on side or on edge.

To connect the bridge I cut some maple the size of my T-slots, with some left over to ride inside the slot opening. I then drilled it to 15/64 and tapped it 5/16-18 and threaded the existing bolts directly into the wood. I was going to add some CA to the wood, but it seems to not have a problem with the threads.

You can read about my exploration into this material in the thread "Innovation"

I am waiting on connectors to extend my track (54" will not work on a bridge with a 48" table.

I also need to come up with a sliding technique for the cross bars. For now they will have to be clamped in place or rely on the weight of the bridge.

Pictures or it didn't happen. right.
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Old 03-26-2018, 12:07 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
For lack of a better name, I am calling it that. Obviously the bridge and track, and other such cost more. But I have $8 worth of rescued wood-plastic composite decking in place of any aluminum extrusions. Since this decking extrusion has a rectangular web, cutting it in one direction or the other creates t-slots either on top, on side or on edge.

To connect the bridge I cut some maple the size of my T-slots, with some left over to ride inside the slot opening. I then drilled it to 15/64 and tapped it 5/16-18 and threaded the existing bolts directly into the wood. I was going to add some CA to the wood, but it seems to not have a problem with the threads.

You can read about my exploration into this material in the thread "Innovation"

I am waiting on connectors to extend my track (54" will not work on a bridge with a 48" table.

I also need to come up with a sliding technique for the cross bars. For now they will have to be clamped in place or rely on the weight of the bridge.

Pictures or it didn't happen. right.

That's some very cool stuff you're working on. Can those pieces hold a decent amount of clamping pressure? No flex on the "SME" when you move the bridge up and down?

Great work!

And yes, I wanted a 49" table as well because all of my sheet goods are 24x48 (purebond ply), but the 55" track is too short. I'll keep my eyes open for a used 70" Festool track. For now, I just use UEG for those 48" rips.
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Old 03-26-2018, 12:22 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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So far they appear to be holding rigid. Even though I haven't backed them up on the sides of the table they don't seem to be offering any flex either.

The bridge seems to not flex away from the table when moving it, even when the track is not attached to the back part of the bridge (because of the length). If it did, however, I would add 2 more bolts and attach it to both the top and bottom slot and it would definitely be dead on rock solid. I may do that anyway.

If I had ti to do over, I might have done the top cross ones a little differently, I would not have cut two slots in the top so quickly. I would have put one in the top and one underneath. I am still trying to come up with a 2-way sliding cradle, and debating cutting an additional slot in the bottom anyway.For the moment, I need to put them where I want them and slap a clamp on them if I don't want them to move.
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Old 03-26-2018, 03:57 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
So far they appear to be holding rigid. Even though I haven't backed them up on the sides of the table they don't seem to be offering any flex either.

The bridge seems to not flex away from the table when moving it, even when the track is not attached to the back part of the bridge (because of the length). If it did, however, I would add 2 more bolts and attach it to both the top and bottom slot and it would definitely be dead on rock solid. I may do that anyway.

If I had ti to do over, I might have done the top cross ones a little differently, I would not have cut two slots in the top so quickly. I would have put one in the top and one underneath. I am still trying to come up with a 2-way sliding cradle, and debating cutting an additional slot in the bottom anyway.For the moment, I need to put them where I want them and slap a clamp on them if I don't want them to move.

very good. glad to hear it's solid.

Do you really need 4 sliding crosses on top? maybe just three? one for a fence, two to capture the wood. I can see how just two would work as well. since you seem to have multiple t-tracks in one "extrusion"

Are those two pieces of vertical ply acting as your fence? I noticed that the fence works better on the opposite end of the Bridge handle, because the downward-forward motion of the bridge pushes the material forward. Unless I have my bridge configured wrong? I'm starting to think i'd prefer an up and down hinge style rather than a handle so my wood stops moving. Not a problem on the EZ-one with the 6-way stop setup, but otherwise i find myself needing to readjust against the fence often.

Otherwise, go solid top (double 3/4" MDF) and eliminate the sliders completely? just need to embed some cheap t-track. That thing will be solid as a rock.

If you do solid top, you can even make festool style dog holes. Another member here, Mike, gave me the idea. There's a jig i had 3dprinted online for $11.50 shipped. I'll make a post about it once it arrives.

All budget friendly. I like it very much!
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Old 03-26-2018, 04:05 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Basically, I took what I could see on the EZ-1 pictures, and what Dino laid out in the "The DIY PBB. ( The money saver )" and tried to emulate it here.

I don't know if I need 3 horizontals or not. But I had the material, and so I have them. I may try and reproduce the SSRK with the one I have left over if I can make sense of how it works.

What you see laid out is just so I could take a picture.
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Old 03-26-2018, 09:44 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Very cool! I'd like to hear about your experience after a few projects. And also how weather affects it. I made mine from 2x and plywood. Aside from normal attention, it also needs seasonal adjustment.

When I built mine a couple of years ago, I also wanted a 48"+ crosscut. So, I got a 72" rail. Also, I used a solid top of plywood and installed a fence and stop with Kreg track. Anyway, the top doubles as an assembly table. One nice thing is I can screw a piece of scrap down to the top as a stop for repeat cuts. Not as elegant as t-tracks, stops, and clamps but it works well and the top can be replaced easily.
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  #7  
Old 03-26-2018, 10:07 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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I got some connector extrusion today and some track so I will extend the track once I drill and tap it.

I guess I can slide a piece of scrap plywood in place and screw something down to it if I wanted to do what you describe.

When I first got my stuff I didn't get the bridge, just the cabinet maker and track. I had a doubled MDF tops on 4 shop tables that I had made. I just cut all over that and made quite a mess of the tops trying to figure how to get reasonable results. I like the bridge better.

The weather should not affect this material, and my shop is heated and cooled. So even if it did, it would be pretty immune.

I have a sample of this:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Cali-Bamboo...ard/1000213051

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Cali-Bamboo...ard/1000213059

It is barely the size of a coaster, but I would like to get a big enough piece to play with. I am currently looking for a decker to get some cutoffs and shorts from.

The neat thing about this stuff is the holes are smaller. They are 1/2" across and would fit a barrel nut (like knockdown hardware) or simply a hardwood dowel drilled and threaded. I even considered opening two of them and possibly fit the ez connector extrusion in it. Or with a beading bit possibly make a self aligning piece.

But for now, I just need to extend my track and make something
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Old 03-30-2018, 02:39 PM
Nutcase Nutcase is offline
 
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At this point I can't look at something like your table without wondering how it would work with the bridge mounted on a beam. A beam with a track like the one I'm using would offer a structure for anchoring the cross supports.
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Old 03-30-2018, 02:48 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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The only concern I would have would be flex at some distance. But if you have a track, t or dovetail down the center of the beam you could manage 2 way slide. You may want a caster leg on the ends of the cross members to overcome flex.
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Old 03-30-2018, 09:02 PM
Nutcase Nutcase is offline
 
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One could have a table built around support on the center line, like an open top trestle table with a beam in the center. The lateral edges could support the ends of the cross pieces.

Or set things up so that the beam can rotate into a panel saw orientation to take the torque off the lateral supports.
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