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  #1  
Old 12-26-2013, 01:37 AM
Pintail Pintail is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 14
Default To buy or not to buy?

Sorry if this is in the wrong place. I'm considering the end of year EZ Shop Special. Have never used a track saw system and am fairly new to wood working. I have done some simple projects and a lot of scroll sawing.

Want to make some bookcases, shelving, and built in cabinets at some point in the next couple of years. So I have some questions.

1. Interested in making custom picture frames. Would I need a router table for that using a fixed base or can the EZ system handle that? What type of learning curve am I looking at in learning to use the system?

2. How do the saw and router in the special measure up to the other ones offered on this site?

3. Other than you tube and the web site and the forum is there any other instructional videos or plans?
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  #2  
Old 12-26-2013, 02:21 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pintail View Post
Sorry if this is in the wrong place. I'm considering the end of year EZ Shop Special. Have never used a track saw system and am fairly new to wood working. I have done some simple projects and a lot of scroll sawing.

Want to make some bookcases, shelving, and built in cabinets at some point in the next couple of years. So I have some questions.

1. Interested in making custom picture frames. Would I need a router table for that using a fixed base or can the EZ system handle that? What type of learning curve am I looking at in learning to use the system?

Hi, Pintail, welcome to the forum.
Whichever system you choose (router table or EZ system), will require a learning curve. In common, the two methods require: router placement and control; material feed-control. The router table has a fixed router placement (under the table), so you're left with determining the best material feed-control. The EZ system allows you to fix the router in one place (overhead, ie. above the material) and move the material, as well as fix the material in one place and move the router. If you're not already router savvy, I would recommend becoming familiar with them. If you don't have a router, perhaps you can get together w/someone who does, and have them walk you thru the basics; maybe run some simple edge profiles on scrap wood, etc. Whenever I get a new power tool, the first thing I do (after reading the manual) is plug it in and fire it up- just feeling the torque of the motor is educating in itself.


2. How do the saw and router in the special measure up to the other ones offered on this site?

I can't comment specifically on the ones offered in the special, but there is a difference between routers- mainly in the ergonomics dept. Eg. I have two large plunge routers: a Bosch and a Makita. For me, the Bosch is much easier to set up and use, even tho my Makita is a noticeably finer tool. As a result, I gravitate to the Bosch. If you do end up partnering with a friend who already has some routers, have them show you some of the ergonomic differences. Along with ergonomics, horse power is important, but your friend can help you there. With routers, seems that most of us end up with more than one- it's nice to have designated routers for profiles we use often so you don't have to continually change out router bits. (Lazy decadence, I know........ )

3. Other than you tube and the web site and the forum is there any other instructional videos or plans?

Not sure what else you might be wanting; youtube, the website, and the forum pretty much cover the bases, excepting, perhaps, being able to get together with someone in person to go over procedures. If you're anywhere near the Texas Hill Country, I can be available. Then, also, you can post to the forum with your specific questions/issues/projects, and the folks here will help.

Hope this helps,
Rick
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  #3  
Old 12-26-2013, 07:56 PM
Pintail Pintail is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 14
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Thanks for the nformation Rick. Some of my concerns are what some of the nay sayers are saying. Especially about dust control. Planning on getting the best vac I can afford and connecting to the dust ports on the tools.

The learning curve wasn't so much about the router as it was learning all the different ways you can set the ez system up and doing it in an efficient manner which isn't such a pita it gets stuffed in the attic and my wife keeps telling me how I wasted a lot of money.

Also I am near the hill country (sort of) Leander which is near 1431 and Palmer.
Would you mind sharing your experience with the EZ system and what if anything you would do different?

Thanks again for all the good info.
Arthur
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  #4  
Old 12-26-2013, 09:49 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 899
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pintail View Post
Thanks for the nformation Rick. Some of my concerns are what some of the nay sayers are saying. Especially about dust control. Planning on getting the best vac I can afford and connecting to the dust ports on the tools.

The learning curve wasn't so much about the router as it was learning all the different ways you can set the ez system up and doing it in an efficient manner which isn't such a pita it gets stuffed in the attic and my wife keeps telling me how I wasted a lot of money.

Also I am near the hill country (sort of) Leander which is near 1431 and Palmer.
Would you mind sharing your experience with the EZ system and what if anything you would do different?

Thanks again for all the good info.
Arthur
Wow, go figure! In Leander! After 40+ years in Austin, we just moved to Kerrville a bit over a year and a half ago. I used to motorcycle out 1431 (other side of 183 from you; sounds like you're not too far from BMC Lumber door mill- I know it well.......): @ Volente, take Lime Creek road till it hits 1431; go left, thru Jonestown and Lago Vista; on into Marble Falls; breakfast at the Bluebonnet Cafe (pie for breakfast, anyone?); return route down 281 to 71. It's so built up out there now, that the 'fun-factor' is almost gone. The explosive growth in the Austin area is one of the main reasons we moved.
Since I'm only down the road from you in Kerrville, perhaps the next time you take the missus to Fredericksburg, you can pop down my way and visit?

Re. EZ stuff: I came from many years of using a table saw; had a need on a job for something like a track saw; did a bit of research of the different brands; chose EZ; did the job; put the track in the corner, forgot about it, and went on with life as usual.
Fast forward some months later; dug the track out and began to think about where I could use it in my work; the 'light came on' as I began to see some of it's possibilities, and I started putting it to work; soon ordered one of the EZ-one work benches w/an SSRK (router kit); also made my own PBB (power bench) with some features the EZ-One didn't offer; in short order, my Delta Unisaw table saw was not being used at all; sold it a year later, after having had it for many, many years- I do not miss it at all; a few years on and I'm still discovering procedures/projects that I couldn't/wouldn't do w/a table saw.

Dust collection w/EZ is something that most guys work at improving. Some of the other tracksaw systems have better 'off-the-shelf' dust collection ability, but w/a bit of work, you can get your dust under control. A quick search on this forum should give you some ideas about what others have done.

Don't know that there's anything I would do differently. I think, in my woodworking journey, moving over to the tracksaw , at the time I did, was right for me. I'd been thinking about moving up to one of the Euro combo saws, but, thankfully, didn't. I like the versatility of the EZ system; the rigidity of the track extrusions lets you do things you couldn't with some of the other tracksaw systems; and the open design of the track allows you, with a bit of creative thinking, to use all 4 sides (something I've done for a few novel projects). Plus, the better safety factor (than a table saw) is great.
But, like anything else, it takes the inner discipline to get the equipment out; go thru the motions of using it; clean up the mess; put it all away. If you're willing to do that, you shouldn't have any problems.

Let me know when you're ready for a visit- any time is fine.
Rick
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  #5  
Old 12-27-2013, 02:02 AM
Pintail Pintail is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 14
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If my wife weren't in love with Austin would have a few acres out in the hinterlands. You're right about that route probably not so much fun for a Sunday bike cruise. Southern Basteop county out on 535 and in that area still rural.

Careful,what you wish for, been dying to find an excuse to take my new truck out on the road. Think I'm going o pull the trigger on the EZ system and get a Festool Vac for dust control. Have to check out the bags though. If they really cost 75 apiece will need to rethink that.

Festool is just to expensive and my research, hope it's on track, says that this system is more versitable than the others and a lot easier on the wallet. Somehow I just can't quite drink that green kool-aid.

While it all looks good and simple my pockets are deep enough to became an addict. Hope that makes since to you,
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  #6  
Old 12-27-2013, 08:27 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Austin, Tx.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pintail View Post
If my wife weren't in love with Austin would have a few acres out in the hinterlands. You're right about that route probably not so much fun for a Sunday bike cruise. Southern Basteop county out on 535 and in that area still rural.

Careful,what you wish for, been dying to find an excuse to take my new truck out on the road. Think I'm going o pull the trigger on the EZ system and get a Festool Vac for dust control. Have to check out the bags though. If they really cost 75 apiece will need to rethink that.

Festool is just to expensive and my research, hope it's on track, says that this system is more versitable than the others and a lot easier on the wallet. Somehow I just can't quite drink that green kool-aid.

While it all looks good and simple my pockets are deep enough to became an addict. Hope that makes since to you,
Re. vacs, consider one of these: http://www.industrialvacs.com/Attix_.../302004235.htm
Get a prefilter/liner, and you don't have to worry about the vac bags. Or, consider the new Makita VC 4710 for less $. Also, I believe Nilfisk makes the Festool vac.
Some think this is the king of the hill: http://www.boschtools.com/Products/T...x?pid=3931A-PB
At this price range, I think they'll all do the job adequately.

Should you decide you want to make the drive to Kerrville, contact me on my personal account. It's a yahoo account, bumpnstump at y....etc.
Rick
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  #7  
Old 12-27-2013, 09:59 AM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 74
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I just picked up a Fein Turbo 2 vacuum for $225 shipped off of Ebay.
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  #8  
Old 12-27-2013, 10:43 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Austin, Tx.
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Originally Posted by eddiecalder View Post
I just picked up a Fein Turbo 2 vacuum for $225 shipped off of Ebay.
eddie, sounds like you got some great Christmas tool-money? I was lucky to get the proverbial lump of coal........
Good catch on the vac.
Rick
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  #9  
Old 12-27-2013, 04:39 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Sumter, SC
Posts: 3,682
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The only thing I see missing is some kind of multiform table. The easiest solution is the multiform table plastic kit. That will allow you to use the EZ One as a Multi-form table.

As for the quality of the tools, that could be debated. Some of the fellows on the forum are using the Hitachi saw and prefer it over the Makita.

I've owned a couple of the Hitachi routers and have found them not to be quiet as good as the Bosch 1617. The main difference was the Hitachi had a bit more vibration.


Burt
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  #10  
Old 12-27-2013, 07:39 PM
eddiecalder eddiecalder is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
eddie, sounds like you got some great Christmas tool-money? I was lucky to get the proverbial lump of coal........
Good catch on the vac.
Rick
I'm happy with the purchase but the wife is not.
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