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  #21  
Old 01-04-2014, 10:54 PM
Pintail Pintail is offline
 
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Found a great site called "woodworking for mere mortals" would post a link but currently only have an I Pad as my other computer has issues. Anyway, from all the good advice here and from my research it seems to buy what you need for a project and hopefully they will be useful in other projects.

A couple of things I really want to make are some simple picture frames for posters my son got for Christmas and some a redwood doormat forthehpise. I also have some ideas for a couple of bookcases I want to make. I figure with this in mind will need a round over and something to cut dadoes.

Another tool I'm considering is the Ridgid belt spindle sandsr at HD and am wondering if a belt/disc sander wouldn't be more useful at the present time. Planning on doing boxes on the scrollsaw and a spindle sander is great for that. Application.

The biggest issue is ai only have 1/2 of a two car garage to set up shop in so really need to get creative on tool setup. This is going to be so much fun and I thank all of you for your good advice.
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  #22  
Old 01-05-2014, 03:17 AM
philb philb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 156
Default You got "it" bad!

Pintail: I gotta warn you! You sound like you are half a step away from needing a 12 Step Program! I recognize the symptoms because I have been in need of treatment for some time now! Repent before it is too late! If that is not an option, I would buy a variable speed orbital hook and loop sander. The spindle sander is useful for the scroll saw work so buy that too. Park the car in the rain (the wife can wax it so it will not get too damaged. Move the washer and dryer to the patio, then build an awning or carport over the drive for extra maneuvering room (park the car in the street). Buy and extra heavy extension cord that will reach to the curb for those extended projects. Sell the car and buy more wood (you can take a bus and the wife can walk -- just buy her a headband and water bottle so the neighbors won't ask questions). Actually every room needs a bookcase. Build the kid a hobby horse (since he doesn't need to actually go anywhere). Boxes! Women love boxes -- seriously! -- at farmers market the women go nuts over boxes, big, little, fancy and utilitarian, it does not matter. You will avoid high alimony payments if you are always making her something and boxes are a hit.

Just be sure to seek help if you get interested in a lathe ( I had 3 until about 4 months ago). I got a new lathe in Dec. 2012 and I make about 3 to 4 bowls or other projects a week. Which is only exceeded by the number of projects coming off my Epilog Helix 24 laser, that I got last May -- I had to remodel and rewire the room -- it is my new bedroom (without the bed).

Now do you understand why I advise you to seek help? You do not want to end up like me do you?? If that is where you are headed anyway, I have an Excalibur 21 scroll saw and I am always here to share ideas.
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  #23  
Old 01-05-2014, 12:42 PM
Glenn Glenn is offline
 
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pintail, I also have half a double garage for my shop. I divided the garage in half with 3/4 inch white melamine board and then every single thing that touches the floor is on casters. I can move anything/everything in and out etc. With the EZ tools it works well even on 4x8 sheets. ( I also rearrange the shop periodically. )
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  #24  
Old 01-05-2014, 05:43 PM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
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Location: Tulare, CA
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I have several Katana bits and they perform great. But, I am only a hobbiest so my use is fairly light.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2014, 06:36 PM
TooManyToys TooManyToys is offline
 
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Location: Jersey Shore (Not Seaside!)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pintail View Post
..... it seems to buy what you need for a project and hopefully they will be useful in other projects. ..........
And therefore my "TooManyToys" handle.
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  #26  
Old 01-05-2014, 07:35 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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The best advice I've read about beginning with router bits is to stick with 1/2" shaft bits, and to buy a lower-cost bit set to start with ... and then replace those that you actually use - or use the most - with higher quality bits.

I started with an MLCS 15-bit set.

For routing, I have both a Bosch benchtop router table (RA1181) for my Bosch 1617EVSPK router and recently purchased the EZ Super Smart Routing Kit. I bought an extra under table router base (Bosch RA1165 - really just a fixed base without the wood handle knobs) for use with the table and an extra plunge router base (RA1166) for the SSRK. Not trying to push Bosch gear here ... just telling you how I set myself up.

On a very different note ... to rip boards - for picture frames - you'd probably want to buy the EZ Smart Clamp System (current price is $90 ... I think that is for two smart clamps) - which will allow you to connect to narrow boards.

Truth be told, I had purchased the upgrade ($30x2=$60), but later decided that I wanted both regular clamps for simplicity, and the Smart clamps for ripping narrow boards ... so I bought two additional regular clamps ($25x2=$50) and upgraded those instead. The total cost is $110 ... of course it would be cheaper to buy the set of two Smart Clamp System for $90.

I have to say, Eurekazone's on-line product manuals (pdf's) have been improved in a MAJOR way in the last year or so. They are very nice now. Thank you Eurekazone!!
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  #27  
Old 01-06-2014, 12:18 AM
Derrell Derrell is offline
 
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Posts: 31
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The Ridgid osc. spindle & belt sander is a great tool. Once you get one you'll use it for all sorts of things. As for working out of 1/2 of the garage, one thing that has worked well for me was to build a bench against the wall tall enough for tools to fit under it while not is use. For example I have my jointer, planer, & router table on wheels. When not is use they go under the bench and I haven't lost any bench space.
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  #28  
Old 01-06-2014, 01:29 AM
Pintail Pintail is offline
 
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Posts: 14
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Kind of tired tonight. Planning on building rolling cabinets for tools and may put in a long work bench along one wall. At least his garage has an expansion joint in the middle which makes it a bit easier to divide.

The two most expensive items I have bought in my life was my first set of golf clubs and an Excaliber 21 scrollsaw. Not sure but I think up to now the golf clubs were more expensive but the scrollsaw is catching up.

I can't get addicted to something cheap like heroin or meth oh no not me. It has to be golf and woodworking two of the most expensive hobbies there is. The worst part is the new house has an usable attic. A fairly large usable attic. It can hold a lot of stuff leaving even more room for expensive stuff.

Crossing my fingers That a lathe doesn't show up sometime this year.

Thanks for all the food advice.
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  #29  
Old 01-06-2014, 06:45 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pintail View Post
I can't get addicted to something cheap like heroin or meth oh no not me. It has to be golf and woodworking two of the most expensive hobbies there is.
So now you tell me? Once I'm already committed At least I don't play golf. I garden, and even though there was a book about the $10 tomato with home gardening, at least I get some fresh food.

To create more room in shops, I recently saw something where that Ridgid sander was mounted on a piece of plywood, as were some other tools. The guy had built a cabinet to house all of the tools with the attached plywood as slide in shelves. He had two different height worktable that he built and he attached the tool he needed to the top. It's a very cool concept for a small shop that looks quick and fairly easy to make. I'm strongly considering it.

If I do I'll start with the tall unit and the tools can be clamped to sawhorse stands. The EB4424 that he mentions is the Ridgid sander.

Here's his description
Quote:
I made rolling stands one 24" one 36" and a storage cabinet. All my portable machines are on the same size chunk of plywood and both stands have a cutout frame to hold all the tools, there are screws with wooden hold downs on each side to secure the tools. The little drill press has been replaced by a floor model and my EB4424 now resides in that spot.

pictures from this forum: https://www.ridgidforum.com/forum/t19201/
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Last edited by Goblu; 01-06-2014 at 08:05 PM.
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  #30  
Old 01-06-2014, 08:22 PM
TooManyToys TooManyToys is offline
 
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Location: Jersey Shore (Not Seaside!)
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Well Katie, since you need something for that new Dewalt planer .....


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgGmebcgvM8
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