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  #11  
Old 03-02-2018, 10:34 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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First attempt. I used lag bolts to attach the bridge to the legs of the table. I then added additional 2x4 to span between the legs to build it out even with the legs. Then I added a flat piece of plywood square to the track to use as a fence. You can see where I have clamped different pieces to it as length stops to be able to cut reproducible sized panels and pieces. I assume this is the worst possible way to do this, and somehow I should be using some kinds of extrusions, sme and b2b and other pieces.

Open to suggestions and modifications, help me, "pimp my PBB"

-- Abs

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  #12  
Old 03-03-2018, 07:18 AM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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What an awesome setup!! But, why does it look like you have a workshop in the middle of your kitchen heh heh heh ... not that there's anything wrong with that!! :-)

I like the idea of having the foam top on your bench.

Last fall I purchased a pre-owned B300 Bridge and, although I have a pre-owned EZ-One, I keep watching for ideas on how to use that B300 Bridge. Right now my thinking is to set it up kind of like a long wide miter table, but with the somewhat dedicated purpose of making long narrow rips -- kind of a like a very narrow EZ-One Max. I picture using two T-tracks to either hold stops, or to attach a long straight fence to one side.

Ken
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  #13  
Old 03-03-2018, 09:22 AM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Hi Ken, the wood shop shares space with my soap making studio, and my bee barn, as well as my wife is not taking up space refinishing furniture. What you are seeing in the background is the soap studio.

When I lagged the bridge to the table leg it was too tall so I needed something underneath and the foam fit the bill. There is a picture of this table somewhere in another post that shows it is just 2x4's with cross pieces in the center. You can actually see the double mdf+masonite working top in the upper right side of the photo leaning against the other table.

Anyway, with this setup, I was able to trim my cabinet panels to the same length (using the clamped stop all the way to the left). You can then see the 24mm spacer that differentiates the height of the back of the cabinet that insets the grooves. Then the next stop handled the nailers that fit between the panels (it would have handled the tops and the bottoms too if they hadn't already been cut.). FWIW, I will do something similar to cut the door parts. I figure if I make these stops long enough that they meet the end of the fence and I can add another piece of wood so they hook the end of the fence, they will be actual story sticks for a cabinet. Problem at this point, I still have to do the widths of everything either with the table saw or possibly the UEG because I am limited by the length across the table instead of going the long way. But if I went the long way, 24" is not wide enough for the current stops I put in place. I like the results I get with the UEG, but I am afraid I don't have a good way of using it on very thin 6mm plywood. Perhaps I need to make a kind of table for that next.

Many of the images I see for the PBB are using lots of SME across the cutting area of the table. I am not certain from the images I am seeing how one is not cutting into aluminum all the time, or if there is a gap in there somewhere. Or how exactly they are attached. Perhaps I can figure out how to do this 1 extrusion or 2 at a time. Seems, many of the images are in areas of the website that are no longer available, and others are hosted on outside servers that also are not there

Hopefully I can figure this out, as I do have some extrusions to start with, but they are all B2B and none of them are very long.

Seems like all the ones I am seeing have an extrusion across the front where the bridge connects, and it also one across the top parallel to it but at a right angle to it. I don't quite get how these two are connected and it seriously looks like that one is going to get cut through, but perhaps I am missing something by just looking at the photos.

I know there are some potentially great configurations, I am just not sure what they are yet. Also, it would seem the extrusions may not always be necessary, but not understanding what they are doing in the first design, makes it hard to figure out what to do to as an alternative.
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  #14  
Old 03-03-2018, 11:57 AM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Hopefully I can figure this out, as I do have some extrusions to start with, but they are all B2B and none of them are very long.

Seems like all the ones I am seeing have an extrusion across the front where the bridge connects, and it also one across the top parallel to it but at a right angle to it. I don't quite get how these two are connected and it seriously looks like that one is going to get cut through, but perhaps I am missing something by just looking at the photos.

.
The only purpose, that I can see, of attaching the bridge to extrusions, is being able to slide the bridge horizontally.

On the other hand, drilled directly to the table, the way yours is set up, means it will never go out of alignment.

Pros and cons.

Best of both worlds? Guide pin holes in your extrusion. As long as the drill press isn't wayyyy off, it shouldn't be more than 1/64th out of square every time you disconnect and reconnect.

Pre drilled alignment holes in sme and b300 plastic would be a nice offering from EZ
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  #15  
Old 03-03-2018, 01:42 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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From what I can see it might be nice to have the extrusion on either the front or the back, so that it can easily enough be squared to stops or otherwise act as a fence of sorts. I assume that Though I might like to remove it, I don't see much reason to move it.

I think I need to be able to set stops t be able to cut at most 768mm (30"). I need to be able to make square cuts, and doubt I would ever care to do any angles whatsoever. I do, however think I need more depth than I currently have, since 24" is not enough to cut the whole back insert height, or rip door style width. I think I may simply add an extension box to the opposite leg of the table to get my track out to its full length.

Still not sure what the function of the extrusions that are shown perpendicular to the track serve. Perhaps they are good places for stops and such, though I am not sure what prevents cutting through them.

In one article, Dino said if you have an SSRK, (wish I was able to take advantage of the sale but missed it ) you could make your own SME out of wood. Or at least something that would take its place. I am up for trying anything, as long as I understand what I am doing.

I am also willing to add extrusions onesie-twosie if I can figure out which ones add function at which point. If I could figure a good way to do it, I would also consider drilling the holes to do MTF like top, but I am not sure I could make them square in both directions.
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  #16  
Old 03-03-2018, 05:50 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Extrusion insets/inserts in a workbench table top allows one to set up for varying sizes of cuts by changing the position of stops that are inserted into the extrusions and slid into position and tightened.

Pic one shows a couple of options for extrusion insets/inserts. Top and bottom, in the pic, are EZ T-track. Into the T-track are a couple of options of things to slide into the t-track to use as stops: bottom shows a piece of raised connector, held in place by an allen nut; top shows a block of plastic (could be wood, metal, anything) held in place by a piece of regular EZ extrusion w/a lock knob holding it in place. Instead of EZ t-track, one could us B2B as an option (hopefully longer than the short sample shown in the pic). Or, one could use EZ SMEs, or sections of track turned upside down, or any of the other EZ extrusions.

OR..... forget using the EZ extrusions and use readily available t-track from Rockler, Orange aluminum, Peachtree, or any other supplier. Same principle as using the EZ extrusions.

OR, forget extrusions altogether and do what's shown in pic two. T-nuts inserted into the work top allow slotted stops to be positioned where needed. A series of t-nuts the length of the work table would allow one to reposition the sliding stops if one location isn't enough near/far away.
Whether I'm using the extrusion option or the sliding/slotted stops, I usually incorporate a removable fence, as shown in pic one and two.

But, if I'm understanding your situation, having to re-set up for repetitive cuts using either of the methods described above might be a bit tedious? And, is your situation more along the lines of making repetitive cuts quickly w/out having to remeasure and readjust the cutting-length stops? If that is the case, it looks to me, from your pic, that you may already be 95% there.

Pic 3 shows a full length fence across the front of the workbench (like you have in your pic). On that fence is a stop, held on with a spring clip. Note on the left end of the stop is a washer (which is screwed tightly into the end of the stop) and is indexed into a kerf in the front fence. On the right end of the stop (difficult to see in pic 3) is a screw. (pic 4 shows it better; pic 5 is another view)

To use, set the stop on the fence at the exact place you want one of your predetermined cabinet measurements to be- eg. 30". When you have it there, kerf the fence to allow the washer to fall into the kerf. Now, whenever you want a 30" piece, you'll drop this stop into it's place, indexed by the washer/kerf relationship, clamp with the spring clamp, butt the material to be cut against the screw, pulling tightly against the front fence, drop the bridge and cut.

Repeat this procedure of fence kerfing for each of the cut lengths you are needing to make. Then, for whatever predetermined length you are wanting to cut, drop the stop into it's respective kerf, clamp, you're good to go.

NOTES:
-due to human error, one might not be able to make one stop work in all of the kerfed location. Therefore, I recommend you make a different stop for each kerfed location. Easy enough to do: make a long piece of the stop material, cut off a couple of inches for each stop needed. Attach the washer and screw and it's ready for use. Doesn't matter if the stops are different size, since each stop will be assigned it's own place on the fence. Color code them; magic marker them; or whatever works for your to quickly identify which stop you need at any given time.

-The screw on the right serves two purposes: a) allows for sawdust buildup where the material to be cut abuts the stop to not come between the stop and the material being cut; b) allows you to 'fine tune' your measurement. Suppose you wanted to have a kerf/stop give you a measurement of 30" exact, but you missed the kerfing by 1/32". In that case, install the stop and adjust the depth of the screw to where the stop now gives you exactly 30".

-When cutting the kerfs, it is almost impossible to cut the kerf exactly the width of the washer. The kerf is usually going to end up larger than the washer. No problem; when you insert the stop/washer, move it to the left side of the kerf and then clamp in place. Do that every time you use the stops, and you will get consistent results.

HTH,
Rick
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  #17  
Old 03-03-2018, 08:54 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
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Wow Rick, that is awesome!

I will definitely use the kerfed stop idea.

How did you attach the B2B?

Perhaps I could route some t-grooves or get some t-nuts or threaded inserts.

Though, with the common designs I've been seeing how is it avoided cutting through the extrusions?

I've considered extending the table at the leg to be able to handle more of the track, as you can see I am very choked up on it at the far end. I assume I don't quite need 48" so I will keep it across the shorter side of the table, but I think I do want something closer to 3 feet. On the other hand, it would seem useful to have move space on the cutoff side. Not sure if I want to move the bridge, or provide some overhang on that side.

Still looking for ideas that will make things more efficient.
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  #18  
Old 03-04-2018, 01:13 AM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Rick, nice setup. Silly question, but how do you prevent the cutoff from just falling to the floor? Doesn't seem like there's any room on the table for it
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  #19  
Old 03-04-2018, 08:49 AM
Dino Dino is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofu View Post
Rick, nice setup. Silly question, but how do you prevent the cutoff from just falling to the floor? Doesn't seem like there's any room on the table for it
you can easily install supports in hinges. ( folded when not in use)
1x3" 0r 1x4" screwed to the hinge that is screwed to the frame of the PBB.

If you have a tablesaw...you can do the same by screwing the bridge to the fences. You want more accuracy? use rack and pinion type fences like the Dewalt tablesaws.

You want the best bevels and best miters? a simple digital protractor will
give you all the accuracy needed. you can even have a tilting table made from wood and 2 simple hinges.

The Bridge is only a method to safety and accuracy.
speed and the rest can be bone by reading Rick's posts as well as
other PRO-ez users. I saw so many good ideas here that I cannot help my self from jumping into Rick's Posts and say thanks for posting.

thanks
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  #20  
Old 03-04-2018, 04:41 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Wow Rick, that is awesome!

I will definitely use the kerfed stop idea.

How did you attach the B2B?

Perhaps I could route some t-grooves or get some t-nuts or threaded inserts.

Though, with the common designs I've been seeing how is it avoided cutting through the extrusions?

I've considered extending the table at the leg to be able to handle more of the track, as you can see I am very choked up on it at the far end. I assume I don't quite need 48" so I will keep it across the shorter side of the table, but I think I do want something closer to 3 feet. On the other hand, it would seem useful to have move space on the cutoff side. Not sure if I want to move the bridge, or provide some overhang on that side.

Still looking for ideas that will make things more efficient.
See the 3 pics re. options to attach the B2B.

pic one shows one option using screws to fasten to a piece of routed-out wood. The routed wood attaches to the underside of the worktop. Depth of rout is: thickness of the worktop subtracted from the height of the B2B. Drill and countersink the screws and you won't have any issues with EZ connectors hitting the screw heads when you slide in your stops.

pic two shows the same routed wood set-up, but this time, I've used a piece of studded EZ connector on the bottom of the B2B and held in place with a knob. On top of the B2B is a moveable stop, in this case, made out of plastic; wood is fine to use also.
The benefit, to me, of mounting this way is that if you only have a short, say 12" piece of B2B, but you need it to do duty over a long table, you can loosen the underneath knob, slide the B2B down to where you want it to be, and using a connector/knob, refasten in the new location. That way, you don't need long pieces of B2B to entirely span the full distance.

third pic shows the same set-up, except instead of using a routed under-wood, I've used spacers between the underwood and the top.

T-nuts can be had from these folks: https://www.albanycountyfasteners.co.../1102-0086.htm
They also have threaded inserts.

Re. cutting thru extrusions: each person handles this differently. Some run the extrusions thru the cutting area and their bench design allows that to be ok. Others run the extrusions in such a way that they don't get cut- suits their design. If you mount the B2B like I've shown in pic 2, you can move the B2B to as close to the saw blade as you'd like to, or, put it where it gets cut- whichever way suits your workbench is ok. It's usually not an issue if the extrusions are cut, as long as the pieces either side of the cut are anchored securely.

Dino's idea a couple of posts after yours is a good/simple way to make a 'table extender': mount a hinged extension platform on the cut-off side of your workbench. Or, if you'd rather, move the bridge to where it is more centralized in your existing bench to provide support both right and left. Either way is fine; depends on what works best in your shop.

HTH,
Rick
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