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  #1  
Old 10-27-2010, 12:59 PM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Illinois
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Default PBB to EZ-One

I have made the upgrades to my DIY PBB (see the Simple PBB Design thread). I removed the plywood and MDF top along with the Incra T-track Plus and replaced with EZ extrusions. I kept the overall wood frame and legs with a few modifications to allow for clearance of the sliding brackets. I also kept the nesting table but will make some modifications to it....mostly is that it won't be attached to the main table and therefore won't slide into a nesting position as the original design had. The main table basically looks like an EZ-One now. I have made some plywood inserts for sliding modules. Since I don't have any of the T-nuts that Dino uses I found some old washer head screws from some knockdown furniture and seems to be working so far for the sliding modules. I may have to call Dino and get some of those T-nuts.

The sliding stops and sliding fences are working great. Squaring the bridge was a little fussy but I think it is good now. The sliding brackets with the SMEs is a very nice feature...and one of the reasons I made the upgrades. The other reason I made the upgrade was the squaring capabilities (stops and squaring SSME -- I used 48" instead of 60"). The only thing I think I need to add now are the tape measures to allow for accurate setting of the sliding stops. In the future I may also add another sliding bracket with SMEs to give me a far end set and a middle set.

The only problem I have seen was when I was cross-cutting red oak door rails last night I had chip out on the under far-side of the piece. I don't know if the foam is not creating a firm enough zero-clearance support. I am not too bothered by the chip out because I am using tongue and groove joinery for the rails and stiles so the chipped out area will end up getting routed away. But for other pieces that won't get cut away I will have to figure out what the issue is.

Overall, I am very pleased with the set up. For anyone who has a DIY PBB and thinking about an upgrade, talk to Dino about the parts that are needed. It is very worthwhile. For those that are ready to make the plunge to the official EZ-One, you will not regret it. Buying the full EZ-One will save the headaches that come with DIY versions.

For those who are saying "Come on Joe, where are the pictures", I will work on getting some this weekend and post them here. I have to clean up all the wood scraps, cut-offs, and saw dust first

Joe
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  #2  
Old 10-28-2010, 10:00 AM
Dino Dino is offline
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Location: Edison NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitejacket View Post
I have made the upgrades to my DIY PBB (see the Simple PBB Design thread). I removed the plywood and MDF top along with the Incra T-track Plus and replaced with EZ extrusions. I kept the overall wood frame and legs with a few modifications to allow for clearance of the sliding brackets. I also kept the nesting table but will make some modifications to it....mostly is that it won't be attached to the main table and therefore won't slide into a nesting position as the original design had. The main table basically looks like an EZ-One now. I have made some plywood inserts for sliding modules. Since I don't have any of the T-nuts that Dino uses I found some old washer head screws from some knockdown furniture and seems to be working so far for the sliding modules. I may have to call Dino and get some of those T-nuts.

The sliding stops and sliding fences are working great. Squaring the bridge was a little fussy but I think it is good now. The sliding brackets with the SMEs is a very nice feature...and one of the reasons I made the upgrades. The other reason I made the upgrade was the squaring capabilities (stops and squaring SSME -- I used 48" instead of 60"). The only thing I think I need to add now are the tape measures to allow for accurate setting of the sliding stops. In the future I may also add another sliding bracket with SMEs to give me a far end set and a middle set.

The only problem I have seen was when I was cross-cutting red oak door rails last night I had chip out on the under far-side of the piece. I don't know if the foam is not creating a firm enough zero-clearance support. I am not too bothered by the chip out because I am using tongue and groove joinery for the rails and stiles so the chipped out area will end up getting routed away. But for other pieces that won't get cut away I will have to figure out what the issue is.
Overall, I am very pleased with the set up. For anyone who has a DIY PBB and thinking about an upgrade, talk to Dino about the parts that are needed. It is very worthwhile. For those that are ready to make the plunge to the official EZ-One, you will not regret it. Buying the full EZ-One will save the headaches that come with DIY versions.

For those who are saying "Come on Joe, where are the pictures", I will work on getting some this weekend and post them here. I have to clean up all the wood scraps, cut-offs, and saw dust first

Joe
No pictures? no good.
the chipping has nothing to do with the foam.
blade rotates and forces the fibres upwards.
The antichip system ( insers and edges) keep the fibres from uplifting
at the top side.
The bottom ( far side corner ) is unprotected and the blade is pushing the fibres to empty air.

Lower your blade to increase the protection
or put something else behind the wood.
1/2'' x 1/2" strip? tape at the cut line?
the sliding stops are designed to go right next to the blade.
adjust the stops?

tx
d
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  #3  
Old 10-28-2010, 10:22 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Joe,

I use red oak extensively, and it is bad about doing that. The best thing is to have a piece of scrap butted against the outside edge. I usually just make the work piece slightly over width and clean up the edges with the jointer.
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  #4  
Old 10-28-2010, 11:59 AM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
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Location: Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
No pictures? no good.
the chipping has nothing to do with the foam.
blade rotates and forces the fibres upwards.
The antichip system ( insers and edges) keep the fibres from uplifting
at the top side.
The bottom ( far side corner ) is unprotected and the blade is pushing the fibres to empty air.

Lower your blade to increase the protection
or put something else behind the wood.
1/2'' x 1/2" strip? tape at the cut line?
the sliding stops are designed to go right next to the blade.
adjust the stops?
Dino -- I knew there had to be an easy solution. I keep forgetting about the rotation and how the circular saw is different than the table saw....still learning. Also, as I was typing my first message I was thinking about how I always had the same problem with my miter saw because of the opening at the back between the fences. I thought about adding a strip as a backer but the tape is a good idea and the use of the sliding stop I never thought of. If I understand correctly I would use it is a fence to support the back of the workpiece on the cross-cut and butt it right up to the blade so the stop serves a zero-clearance function.

Dik -- Good ideas

Pictures will be coming soon

Joe
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  #5  
Old 10-28-2010, 01:02 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Joe,

Simpliest solution is to back the cut with a scrap. I'm also working on some oak doors at the moment and have the same issue. If you are not using a 40 tooth blade, that will help but not eliminate the problem.

I've been considering making a fence with 1/2" wood or plastic and connector. A scrap works but it is difficult to keep in position. I said 1/2" because the wood is usually 3/4" and I want the rail to hold the wood.



Burt
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  #6  
Old 10-28-2010, 03:04 PM
Randal Stevenson Randal Stevenson is offline
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Stupid question, but won't the height of the foam filled, SME have some effect? (lower, not touching, allowing the workpiece to vibrate some and chip, verses supporting the work)
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  #7  
Old 10-28-2010, 03:25 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Originally Posted by Randal Stevenson View Post
Stupid question, but won't the height of the foam filled, SME have some effect? (lower, not touching, allowing the workpiece to vibrate some and chip, verses supporting the work)
Probably not. The actual tearout is on the backside of the cut. A good sacrificial fence is the best solution.



Burt
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  #8  
Old 10-28-2010, 06:35 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burt View Post
Probably not. The actual tearout is on the backside of the cut. A good sacrificial fence is the best solution.



Burt
Burt - this has me thinking. A while back I bought an EZ-ready Makita 5104 from Dino. It has the UHMW base with the renewable anti-chip. I just recently got my new Hilti 267E up and running. It has a factory installed EZ-base. I notice the chipping to be less with the Makita. I know the Makita is a largeer saw but do you think the thicker anti-chip on the Makita has something to do with this?

Mike
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  #9  
Old 10-28-2010, 07:19 PM
Burt Burt is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
Burt - this has me thinking. A while back I bought an EZ-ready Makita 5104 from Dino. It has the UHMW base with the renewable anti-chip. I just recently got my new Hilti 267E up and running. It has a factory installed EZ-base. I notice the chipping to be less with the Makita. I know the Makita is a largeer saw but do you think the thicker anti-chip on the Makita has something to do with this?

Mike
I really don't know. How does the quality of the two blades compare?

You could screw a piece of plastic to one of the inserts for use off the rail and give it a try.

Burt
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  #10  
Old 10-30-2010, 01:47 PM
whitejacket whitejacket is offline
 
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Location: Illinois
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Default The Pictures-part 1

As promised here are the pictures of my DIY PBB converted to a DIY EZ-One. In the first 3 pictures you can see the stops in place from various set ups. I also made sliding modules from scrap pieces of plywood. When I have more time I plan to resize them and make more to fit the openings better. As you can see in the 4th picture I used small screws to allow the panels to slide in the SME. To make room for the sliding bracket I had to turn the cross pieces in the middle of the table 90 degrees. It worked perfectly.

More pictures in the next post.

Joe
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