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  #1  
Old 03-11-2017, 11:11 AM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 30
Default right or left side of bridge?

Hi All,

I am new to EZ world and would like to see what the experienced users prefer.....

(right side blade saw) When using the bridge on EZ1 or PBB, do you use the area under the bridge on the left side as your "keeper" piece (so that you can use the cut line exactly as is) and use the right side for the waste or leftover piece? that way the user does not have to calculate the saw kerf effect on the workpiece....does this make sense?

whatever you prefer, please state, and most importantly, what side of the bridge do you find that you need the most room? has this ever been a concern for you?

thanks,
Jim
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  #2  
Old 03-11-2017, 04:31 PM
Glenn Glenn is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 96
Default

I have the keeper under the track (to the left) I have about 8 inches to the non keeper side (to the right)
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  #3  
Old 03-11-2017, 09:44 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 819
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
Hi All,

I am new to EZ world and would like to see what the experienced users prefer.....

(right side blade saw) When using the bridge on EZ1 or PBB, do you use the area under the bridge on the left side as your "keeper" piece (so that you can use the cut line exactly as is) and use the right side for the waste or leftover piece? that way the user does not have to calculate the saw kerf effect on the workpiece....does this make sense?

whatever you prefer, please state, and most importantly, what side of the bridge do you find that you need the most room? has this ever been a concern for you?

thanks,
Jim
Good question, Jim. I, too, would be interested in hearing how other EZ users approach cutting/set-up on their EZ-1s and PBBs.

Here are a couple of pics of my EZ-1 (earlier model, w/the center beam), showing ~37" to the right of the cut-line; ~25" to the left. (Right side saw blade.)

I usually set up my cuts for the keeper-piece to be on the right of the saw blade. I don't use the ACEs in the track, and have made a couple of unique story-sticks to set up for cuts on either right or left of the saw blade; w/the story-sticks accounting for saw blade width.

Sometimes, tho not often, I will set up for the saved piece to be on the left of the saw blade, under the track. Not sure why I originally ended up doing it the way I do- I'm thinking it has to do with what seems fastest to me.

Rick
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  #4  
Old 03-12-2017, 09:01 AM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 30
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Rick,

Do you notice a difference in the quality of cut without the ACE?

thanks,
Jim

Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Good question, Jim. I, too, would be interested in hearing how other EZ users approach cutting/set-up on their EZ-1s and PBBs.

Here are a couple of pics of my EZ-1 (earlier model, w/the center beam), showing ~37" to the right of the cut-line; ~25" to the left. (Right side saw blade.)

I usually set up my cuts for the keeper-piece to be on the right of the saw blade. I don't use the ACEs in the track, and have made a couple of unique story-sticks to set up for cuts on either right or left of the saw blade; w/the story-sticks accounting for saw blade width.

Sometimes, tho not often, I will set up for the saved piece to be on the left of the saw blade, under the track. Not sure why I originally ended up doing it the way I do- I'm thinking it has to do with what seems fastest to me.

Rick
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  #5  
Old 03-12-2017, 11:24 AM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 819
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JamesMac View Post
Rick,

Do you notice a difference in the quality of cut without the ACE?

thanks,
Jim

I've found that quality of cut mainly comes from a) type of saw blade; b) saw/material control; c) utilizing anti-splintering at the cut. The ACE is mainly for a) cut-line indication; b) part of the EZ anti-splintering system.

For saw blades, I've found that the Diablo blades do fine for not too much money; Tenryu are noticeably better, and, in my experience, last a long time. (Diablo at Home Depot; Tenryu here: http://www.carbideprocessors.com/Tenryu/)

I've not had issues with saw/material control when using the EZ track, either on the EZ-1, or out in the field.

For anti-splintering, since I don't use the ACE, here is what I do: In pic 1, you can see an older style saw base, w/an EZ anti-chip insert about to be inserted into the saw base. On the bottom of the insert, you can see I've attached a piece of 1/2" baltic birch plywood. That piece of plywood is the same thickness as the EZ track, and it is attached, so that when a saw kerf is made thru it, there is enough ply left on either side of the blade to perform the anti-chip function on both sides of the saw blade. Works great!

For cut-line indication, I made a couple of simple cut-line indicators- pic 2. The top two are simply pieces of bent wire inserted into a piece of ply that rides (snugly) along the ridge of EZ track; one indicating the right side of a saw blade; one indicating the left side of a saw blade. The wires are sharpened to a point, and are adjustable for when I change saw blades and the cut-line changes on account of the new blade. These indicators are super-precise.

Also in that pic, at the bottom, is a long story stick for setting up for longer cuts. It is simply a 3/4" dowel, flattened on either side to allow a length of stick-down measuring tape to be applied. One side of the story-stick is for setting up on the right side of the track; flip it over and it's for setting up on the left side of the track. At either end of the stick are flat-head screws inserted into the stick, to allow for fine adjustment and for re-setting whenever I change saw blades. This story stick is totally accurate and fast. To use, I slide the collar to the desired measure and tighten it. Then, I index the end screw on the side of the ridge on the EZ track; slide an EZ stop up to the collar and tighten; I'm ready to abut my material to the EZ stop and get to cutting.

Finally, pics 3 and 4, show a jig I made for setting up for short cuts under the track (ie. to the left of my saw blade. The jig is also in pic 1, set up for a cut 7" to the left of the saw blade). Those under-the-track-cuts were always the hardest for me to set up; this jig solves my issue. The pics show a short piece of ply, grooved to ride on the ridge of EZ track. On one side is attached more ply, meant to hang down over the edge of the EZ track and allow a captive piece of 1/4" baltic birch ply to slide in and out. On the 1/4" ply is a sliding index marker and a piece of stick-down measuring tape. The marker is slid to the desired measurement; the entire jig placed on the EZ track; the 1/4" ply slid under the track till the marker abuts the screw on the main body of the jig; the large knob tightened, to hold the 1/4" ply in place. Then, a material stop is slid into the EZ extrusion to abut the 1/4" ply; when tightened, I am now ready for my cut. The actual use of this jig takes less time than it does to read this description, lol. Also, like the long story stick, it is totally accurate and fast.

HTH,
Rick
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  #6  
Old 03-12-2017, 03:37 PM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 30
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Rick,

Do you make your living in the hill country working in your shop? It would appear so.

Thank you for your generosity in posting so much information and including photos.

I was already planning on making some simple jigs to use with my ez1 but you have obviously taken your skills to the next universe.

oh man, your photos etc just inspire a lot more questions....

I have the new style saw base. On the older style base do you have both an "on track" and "off track" style of insert? if so, which insert are you using, and how did you attach the anti-splinter wood piece to it?

what kind of wire did you use for your cut line indicators? after adjustment are they simply held in place by the screw? Do you ever have a situation where the wire moved by accident (dropping etc)?

The long story stick looks to be a great time saver. Does the adjustable collar hold the story stick up to be level after resting the adjustable screw end of story stick against the track ridge and the other end resting on the sliding rail? Where do you get an adhesive tape measure like that? here comes the really dumb question....did you make that 3/4" dowel flat by cutting it with the EZ1? It would seem that the deadwood concept would work pretty well for cutting a round work piece, if you can trap it still. Have you experienced any unforeseen issues cutting a round work piece like that on the EZ1?

In photo 4, what kind of hardware did you use to make the jig? Also, how did you cut the "slot" where the adjustable arm slides through? I know that I have asked a lot of questions and don't want to wear out my welcome. Whatever answers you can give are highly appreciated.

I am seeing a side benefit to all of this. The EZ world entices the user to be more creative and exercise your mind. Lord knows, I need that!

thanks,
Jim (North Texas)
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  #7  
Old 03-12-2017, 05:58 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Kerrville, Tx.
Posts: 819
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Do you make your living in the hill country working in your shop? It would appear so.

Semi-retired from Austin, where I was a 'carpenter' for most of my life. Now, I'm remodeling the house I bought.

I have the new style saw base. On the older style base do you have both an "on track" and "off track" style of insert?

Yes, the old style is just like the new style regarding insert options.

if so, which insert are you using, and how did you attach the anti-splinter wood piece to it?

Off-track; I used a couple of sheetmetal screws (see the pic). Be sure to pre-drill thru the plastic so as not to crack it.

what kind of wire did you use for your cut line indicators?

Something stiff that I found sitting around the shop. Coat hanger wire works well. Be sure to make the bend as close to 90˚ as possible- helps w/accuracy when using. Sharpen the pointer portion of the wire and then flatten the outside edge- helps tremendously when lining up the pointer in the 'exact' spot you're going for.

after adjustment are they simply held in place by the screw?

Yes. In the next pic, you can see three different versions: one on the left is held in by a bent screw; one in the middle has a couple of t-nuts inserted, w/screws thru the t-nuts holding the wire; one on the right is a variation on the theme. There's no real science to this other than making sure the piece of ply that rides the EZ track ridge slides easily, but is not sloppy.

Do you ever have a situation where the wire moved by accident (dropping etc)?

Absolutely. Whenever needed, to set the pointer correctly, make a 1/8-1/4" deep cut in a piece of scrap lumber, under the bridge; do not move that piece of wood! set the indicating jig on the EZ track over the cut; adjust the cut-line indicator wire to whichever side of the saw kerf you want it to indicate; tighten the clamp screw. Total time to do the above takes ~60-90 seconds.

The long story stick looks to be a great time saver.

Since making it, I almost never need/use a regular tape measure when at the EZ-1. Yes, it is a super time saver.

Does the adjustable collar hold the story stick up to be level after resting the adjustable screw end of story stick against the track ridge and the other end resting on the sliding rail?

Close enough. Should you make one, you can make the collar to be any size you'd like in order to have it be where you'd like it to be. My collar diameter is 2", w/a 3/4" hole bored in the middle, and a 'flat' on one side of the circle (mainly to keep it from rolling around)- see the pic.


Where do you get an adhesive tape measure like that?

Rockler, Woodcraft, US Tape, Woodpecker, etc. Most any woodworker supply store will carry it. Google something like "adhesive backed tape measure". On my stick, it is 1/2" wide; different suppliers will have different widths available, different lengths, different lay-out options, reading left-to-right or right-to-left, etc.

here comes the really dumb question....did you make that 3/4" dowel flat by cutting it with the EZ1? It would seem that the deadwood concept would work pretty well for cutting a round work piece, if you can trap it still. Have you experienced any unforeseen issues cutting a round work piece like that on the EZ1?

The initial flat cut was made using the SSRK on the EZ-1. Two 5/8" screws thru the bottom of a 1/4" piece of ply, into the 3/4" dowel, hold the dowel in place to keep it from rolling. Then, snug up the dowel on either side with 3/4" ply, the full length of the dowel. The SSRK will ride on these ply pieces. Using the SSRK (or router, if you don't have an SSRK), begin taking off layers of the dowel to where you have a flat surface just a smidgen wider than the 1/2" required for the adhesive-backed tape measure. Turns out that it's ~1/8" deep cut (hence, you will miss hitting the tips of the 5/8" screws coming in from the bottom). Once you have that flat spot milled on the dowel, remove the dowel from the 1/4" ply and run it thru the planer to plane the opposite side to match the 1st flat side. Now, you have a dowel w/the two flat parts, opposite each other; one side will be set up for layout on the right side of the track; the other will be set up for layout on the left side of the track.
In the pic, you can see how I cut the collar to allow it to tension up a bit when clamped- you might need to practice how much cut is required, so have a couple of extra collar blanks on hand. Also, in the pic, you can see the screw end. To make it, I took a #8 machine screw; dropped it thru a washer; welded it in place; ground it down to be flat. If you don't weld, you can use a ground-down truss-head screw, or any screw, really. To keep it from moving while being tossed around the shop, I added a tightening nut where the screw is threaded into the wood. When finished, rub down the dowel w/a bit of paste wax to allow the collar to slide easily.

In photo 4, what kind of hardware did you use to make the jig?

The small knob on the sliding piece that sets the measurement is a 1/4-20 knurled knob; the treaded part is 1/4-20 carriage bolt. By milling the slot at 1/4", the shoulder of the carriage bolt keeps the bolt from turning as the knob is tightened. Knurled knobs can be had from these guys: http://www.jwwinco.com/, or, in this instance, from this outfit: https://www.albanycountyfasteners.co...Nuts-s/659.htm
The larger knob can be anything- in this case, it's a 1/4" carriage bolt, and held in place with a 1/4" knob.

Also, how did you cut the "slot" where the adjustable arm slides through?

All of the routing was done using the SSRK on the EZ-1. The sliding bar was inserted between two pieces of wood that had been routed to provide snug tolerances to the sliding bar; once assembled, the two pieces of wood were screwed together (in case I wanted to disassemble it).

I am seeing a side benefit to all of this. The EZ world entices the user to be more creative and exercise your mind.

Absolutely!!
Rick
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  #8  
Old 03-12-2017, 09:11 PM
JamesMac JamesMac is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2016
Location: Texas
Posts: 30
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Rick,

Thank you so much for your generosity of all of that information and for your time!

You have given me a lot to study...

Jim
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