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Old 07-28-2017, 07:20 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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Default Using SSRK to Create Dados, Grooves, & Rabbets - A guide I made for myself

Mostly for the sake of my own learning and memory retention I put together this little guide on how use the SSRK to make dados, grooves, and rabbets with a cut width that perfectly matches the width of the material that will be inserted in the dado/groove/rabbet.

The idea is the dado/groove/rabbet would be cut parallel with the rail on which the SSRK slides, and you use the material and router bit to set the cut width OR you use a custom-built spacer whose width equals that of the width of the material minus the width of the router bit.

I'm posting it here just in case anyone else finds it useful. Let me know if you see anything wrong here.
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File Type: pdf EZ Smart Router Dado Width Setup.pdf (1.05 MB, 93 views)
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Old 07-28-2017, 10:44 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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Location: Balko, OK
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The irony for me is that I've been thinking about making a kerf maker or trying to adapt the new Matchfit dado jig.

Someone needed to break it down this way and I don't have be patience for it. Good job.

Like you showed with the spacers, I've used set up bars to account for the width of my router bit since I did my first dado with the SSRK.

Using a scrap from the material to be inserted into the dado eliminates the need to measure which is a good thing since material is rarely, if ever, exactly 3/4", 1/2, etc.

Nevertheless, I recommend to always do a test cut first. Heck, test everything: test cut, test fit, test sand, test stain....
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Old 07-29-2017, 06:15 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Ken, since I'm a visual person, thanks for putting the procedure I use in visual format. I don't do dadoes and rabbets very often, so this will be a real time saver.
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Old 07-29-2017, 10:04 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
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I have a related question about using the material and router bit to set the dado width ...

I've never really been sure what provides the strongest glued joint. If using wood that EXACTLY 1/2 inch in width, do I really want a dado that is EXACTLY 1/2 inch wide? Or do I really want to add some extra clearance for the glue? If extra clearance is recommended, how much on each side of the material?

It would seem pretty easy to use a narrow piece of cardboard or other thin material to add a bit of extra width when setting the stops.
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Old 07-29-2017, 10:14 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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In my experience a lot of glues don't gap fill very well, I figure that if the wood can slide into the slot there is enough room for glue. Epoxy is the exception, epoxy manufacturers caution you to leave room for glue.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
I have a related question about using the material and router bit to set the dado width ...

I've never really been sure what provides the strongest glued joint. If using wood that EXACTLY 1/2 inch in width, do I really want a dado that is EXACTLY 1/2 inch wide? Or do I really want to add some extra clearance for the glue? If extra clearance is recommended, how much on each side of the material?

It would seem pretty easy to use a narrow piece of cardboard or other thin material to add a bit of extra width when setting the stops.
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Old 07-30-2017, 02:30 AM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
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For glue joints, I'm with Sean9c, as usual. When I use glue, caulk, wood putty, or such, to fill a gap in a joint, it's for cosmetic purposes 99% of the time and likely to be painted, not to provide structural integrity. Besides being weak, I think loose joints are ugly and sloppy. When it comes to making strong joints, slow is fast.

The rule of thumb is that a joint should be loose enough to fit together by hand and tight enough to hold together without glue.

I also expect to clean up some squeeze out at glue up and final assembly.

Another consideration, as Sean9c mentioned, is the kind of glue you use. Epoxy needs a little room. Most wood glues, not so much. Some, like Gorilla amber glue, are a horrid choice for joinery because, per instructions, they're designed to react with moisture and expand as they cure pushing the piece out of square. However, it's water resistant when it cures and can be sanded and painted. I've used this stuff instead of wood putty to help repair damaged and rotted joints. With the intention of painting it, of course.

Finally, consider the material itself. Plywood is fairly stable and generally glues up well in any configuration. Solid wood is another story. End grain tends to soak up a lot of glue and usually makes for a weaker joint while long grain needs less glue and makes a stronger bond. A less common consideration is that some woods, like ebony, tend to be relatively oily and don't bond as well with certain adhesives. That said, your average wood glue is designed to handle all of this without issue.
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Old 07-31-2017, 11:09 AM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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(Maybe Burt is listening???)

Burt posted an excellent way to do this: http://tracksawforum.com/showthread....highlight=dado

Unfortunately the picture link no longer works. Maybe Burt could re-link them?

Not easy to describe but he trapped the work piece between two fixed waste boards on an EX-One. Set up the SSRK and cut the dado in the fixed waste boards. Then slide the work piece to match where you want the dado with the one cut in the waste pieces - then slide to do the next. Perfect cut/positing, fast, and best of all not a lot of thinking (little chance of error).

Mike
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