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  #1  
Old 02-28-2018, 04:43 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
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Default Ended up going with another track and saw.

I finally ended up selling off my saw and picking up a pre-configured track-saw system. I went with the new Makita xps01PTJ (cordless tracksaw). The F-tool TS55 doesn't seem like a good option in comparison (power, price, cordless)

Previously, i used my hilti wsc 267-e. It was a great big beefy saw that can cut through concrete without a problem. It was a 7-1/4 blade, so depth was not an issue. Dust collection was pretty good. But the EZ base just wasn't delivering the precision and "everything works out of the box" feeling that an actual tracksaw and coordinating track deliver. I would have kept it for really thick hard lumber, but in reality i'm only cutting sheet goods and 1.5" planed boards.

EZ can do everything that my new saw setup can do, but it isn't as... EZ. From needing to file/sand down the saw-side anti-chip so it wouldn't create a bevel, to needing an actual cut line indicator because the ACE never seemed to be on point -- all minor annoyances that add up. Often, I felt like I was more concerned with tinkering with the tools than actually cutting some wood.

I actually prefer the lighter, thinner Makita track over the EZ extrusion. While it can't be cut down, reversed, and utilized in 100 different ways, if all you want to use it for is a rail for your saw, then it is perfect. The makita doesn't have anti-chip on both sides of the blade like the festool or EZ setup, but it does have a 3mm scoring stop that is easily engaged and seems to work just as well.

It really is so much of a pleasure having your cut line the same EVERY time, no matter what bevel setting you choose. The saw and track finally feel like they were made for each other, rather than cobbled together from different pieces. Everything just works.


I am in the process of reconfiguring my bench, so i haven't thrown the Makita track on the b300 bridge yet, but I expect everything to work just fine.
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  #2  
Old 02-28-2018, 05:32 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Amazing how far cordless tools have come, thank you Li-ion batteries.
I haven't checked in a while but when I did look I was surprised at how few track lengths Makita makes, at least you can just use a Festool track even if they do cost a little more.
I think you make an interesting point about things just working. I feel the same way, I was a machinist for 35yrs, always a hobbyist boatbuilder and remodeler. I can make just about anything, but it just irritates the crap out of me when I buy a tool and then have to change a bunch of things to make it work correctly. That's the manufacturers job. If I'm making something I want to focus on that not on fiddling with my tool to make it work correctly.
Keep us posted on how you mount your Makita track to your B300.
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  #3  
Old 02-28-2018, 09:57 PM
Minnesota Marty Minnesota Marty is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2015
Location: Cottage Grove, MN
Posts: 52
Default Makita cordless track saw for me

I have had the Makita cordless track saw since Xmas. I haven't used it very much yet because it has been so darn cold outside the garage is just freezing. The half dozen times I have used it makes me agree with everything you said. Cordless, great dust collection, accurate setup and out of the box performance is hard to beat. It also works on Triton and Festool track. I purchased some new Triton track at auction and went to Rockler for connectors and now have well over 160" or track I can put together. So, the Triton track for the 8' rips and the Makita track for the 4' and smaller cuts.

I have not had time to try to use my b300 bridge with the Makita or Triton track. So, add me to the loop on how that goes. I don't envision a problem.

Cordless is the future. I have expressed that in other post on this forum and got no response. The best EZ tool I have is the UEG with a Makita 6 1/2" cordless saw attached.

Marty
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  #4  
Old 03-11-2018, 12:51 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by tofu View Post
I finally ended up selling off my saw and picking up a pre-configured track-saw system. I went with the new Makita xps01PTJ (cordless tracksaw). The F-tool TS55 doesn't seem like a good option in comparison (power, price, cordless)


Chris,
Good choice and good luck the same time.
I like to try few new sawsand see how we can make them better,
I'm against front plunge saws. I wished they start making rear plunge saws
like the one from Jinding that is sold by Menards. Or like the Metabo, Hilti and the Festool real plunge saws. Even the Bosch and all the new wormdrives
by SKill Saw.
Why? after 2-3 long cuts you will see why.
You are forced to work awkward while pushing down and push or even pull
the saw in order to cut a 48" wide panel.
You are forced to buy expensive blades and strips. Just a set of replacement strips is close to $100.00 for your setup.
The antiskid ( Foam-like) is good for few cuts and few surfaces..
The rubber anti-chip strip is good for same kerf blades.
The design of the saw can only be good for right or left hand users.
Dewalt track...( yes, I know...similar to ez) and saw are the best design
to avoid some of the above issues and many more.






Previously, i used my hilti wsc 267-e. It was a great big beefy saw that can cut through concrete without a problem. It was a 7-1/4 blade, so depth was not an issue. Dust collection was pretty good. But the EZ base just wasn't delivering the precision and "everything works out of the box" feeling that an actual tracksaw and coordinating track deliver. I would have kept it for really thick hard lumber, but in reality i'm only cutting sheet goods and 1.5" planed boards.

Someone has to wonder here why Hilti stop offering their best saw to the US market. in the Hilti marketing materials and spec's...they agreed with me about front plunge and tracksaws in general.
Hilti call it positive engagement of blade and avoiding kickbacks that many plunge saw users have encounter...Search and you will find more than just few incidents.
EZ with the Hilti on a Moduni base was the ultimate setup for all cuts including
the use of normal sawblades. Bad news for Festool, it was nice for EZ but it don't last for long time.


EZ can do everything that my new saw setup can do, but it isn't as... EZ. From
needing to file/sand down the saw-side anti-chip so it wouldn't create a bevel, to needing an actual cut line indicator because the ACE never seemed to be on point -- all minor annoyances that add up. Often, I felt like I was more concerned with tinkering with the tools than actually cutting some wood.

When you have one base that can be used with just about all saws and weights...
in order to provide the best antichip protection and clean cuts with normal blades
you must apply the right pressure to the materials. The directions are very clean here, sand as you need ( few passes) until the saw is flat to the track.
Using a heavy 10"or 16" saw requires less sanding. The same time you have the right anti-tilt protection and better cuts. The Insert was designed to be used with any saw and the smart base now works with left and right bladed saws and users.
You can actually cut the smart base in half and use it with a 10" or even a 16" blade. The EZ base gets screwed to the sawbase and protects the saw and the track. If the base of the saw is bend and the blade is not parallel to the base...
the ez base fixes that too.


all minor annoyances that add up
Your cut line indicator, the sanding of the ac-2, tinkering the tools...
Your cut line is different with different blade kerfs.
The white edge do not move after is placed on the wood.
There is some flex there for better antichip but the edge stays put by design.
Here you have to do few test cuts without applying extreme pressure.
Take it EZ is the trick here. If you have to apply pressure that is an indicator
for blade change.
The other way is to have special washers /spacers and use the right one
to keep the same cut line.
On the bevels...Here I agree with you but not 100%.
For few or almost never cuts you can always remove the edges and make your own indicator for all setups and all blades. There is not such of thing yet.
Never mind the marketing materials.
Do few bevel cuts with any front plunge saw and be ready to replace the edges with and after each cut. The best way and the only answer to this annoyance
( in general) is to ask other members and you will find many ways to avoid many issues with any setup.





I actually prefer the lighter, thinner Makita track over the EZ extrusion. While it can't be cut down, reversed, and utilized in 100 different ways, if all you want to use it for is a rail for your saw, then it is perfect. The makita doesn't have anti-chip on both sides of the blade like the festool or EZ setup, but it does have a 3mm scoring stop that is easily engaged and seems to work just as well.

It really is so much of a pleasure having your cut line the same EVERY time, no matter what bevel setting you choose. The saw and track finally feel like they were made for each other, rather than cobbled together from different pieces. Everything just works.

Everything is cobbbled together.
Do you think Makita makes all parts for their tools?
Even if they make all parts in house do you think
that they are all put together perfectly? Do we have any idea how many times the parts and later the tools was dropped?
Here where QC comes in and inspections.
I'm the first one to admit that even EZ dropped the ball few times in this and other areas but we are humans and we program the robots...





I am in the process of reconfiguring my bench, so i haven't thrown the Makita track on the b300 bridge yet, but I expect everything to work just fine.
No problems here.
You may need to use their connector or make one or call EZ.
We have all the tracks at hand and we make connectors for any track.
The Bridge is designed and machined to fit All.

Thanks for your feedback.
Good luck with your new setup and wait for the next ez step.
I'm sure you will be the first one to get into the next round of tracks...
Now that you sold your Ez stuff.
For other users with similar "issues" the next generation of ez tools
is backwards comparable to the original track....

tx again
YCF D
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  #5  
Old 03-11-2018, 04:00 PM
MHB MHB is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Jennings, LA
Posts: 18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tofu View Post
I finally ended up selling off my saw and picking up a pre-configured track-saw system. I went with the new Makita xps01PTJ (cordless tracksaw). The F-tool TS55 doesn't seem like a good option in comparison (power, price, cordless)

Previously, i used my hilti wsc 267-e. It was a great big beefy saw that can cut through concrete without a problem. It was a 7-1/4 blade, so depth was not an issue. Dust collection was pretty good. But the EZ base just wasn't delivering the precision and "everything works out of the box" feeling that an actual tracksaw and coordinating track deliver. I would have kept it for really thick hard lumber, but in reality i'm only cutting sheet goods and 1.5" planed boards.

EZ can do everything that my new saw setup can do, but it isn't as... EZ. From needing to file/sand down the saw-side anti-chip so it wouldn't create a bevel, to needing an actual cut line indicator because the ACE never seemed to be on point -- all minor annoyances that add up. Often, I felt like I was more concerned with tinkering with the tools than actually cutting some wood.

I actually prefer the lighter, thinner Makita track over the EZ extrusion. While it can't be cut down, reversed, and utilized in 100 different ways, if all you want to use it for is a rail for your saw, then it is perfect. The makita doesn't have anti-chip on both sides of the blade like the festool or EZ setup, but it does have a 3mm scoring stop that is easily engaged and seems to work just as well.

It really is so much of a pleasure having your cut line the same EVERY time, no matter what bevel setting you choose. The saw and track finally feel like they were made for each other, rather than cobbled together from different pieces. Everything just works.


I am in the process of reconfiguring my bench, so i haven't thrown the Makita track on the b300 bridge yet, but I expect everything to work just fine.
Wise man. Hope perspective buyers will heed your post. Grateful that I didnít get any deeper into EZ than what I did and I was able to return what I did purchase. As I said in past post, I bought the tool to work Ė not work on the tool it to make it work.
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  #6  
Old 03-11-2018, 05:33 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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I'm always puzzled when someone says that the cutline changes with different kerf width blades. The hub side of the blade disc is always in the same place, no matter how thick the blade is, that is the side that is against your anti-chip edge. The only thing that is going to effect your cutline is how much the carbide
inserts on the blade overhang the blade disc, if that varies blade to blade your cutline will. It's not the thickness of the blade
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  #7  
Old 03-11-2018, 06:41 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I'm always puzzled when someone says that the cutline changes with different kerf width blades. The hub side of the blade disc is always in the same place, no matter how thick the blade is, that is the side that is against your anti-chip edge. The only thing that is going to effect your cutline is how much the carbide
inserts on the blade overhang the blade disc, if that varies blade to blade your cutline will. It's not the thickness of the blade
Yes Sean, The kerf makes the difference and if you want perfection
you can use spacers.

tx
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  #8  
Old 03-11-2018, 09:45 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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What? Never mind.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dino View Post
Yes Sean, The kerf makes the difference and if you want perfection
you can use spacers.

tx
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  #9  
Old 03-11-2018, 07:18 PM
Absinthe Absinthe is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2016
Posts: 268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I'm always puzzled when someone says that the cutline changes with different kerf width blades. The hub side of the blade disc is always in the same place, no matter how thick the blade is, that is the side that is against your anti-chip edge. The only thing that is going to effect your cutline is how much the carbide
inserts on the blade overhang the blade disc, if that varies blade to blade your cutline will. It's not the thickness of the blade
Well, when aligning the saw to the base, the little fingers are based against the plate of the saw rather than the teeth. Different blades may have their carbide thicker or thinner or offset differently. FWIW, the plate of the saw itself may not even be dead flat. If one were to really want to do an alignment it should be against the edge of the teeth not the plate of the blade.
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  #10  
Old 03-11-2018, 11:21 PM
tomp913 tomp913 is offline
 
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Posts: 243
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Absinthe View Post
Well, when aligning the saw to the base, the little fingers are based against the plate of the saw rather than the teeth. Different blades may have their carbide thicker or thinner or offset differently. FWIW, the plate of the saw itself may not even be dead flat. If one were to really want to do an alignment it should be against the edge of the teeth not the plate of the blade.
If you look at the teeth on a saw blade, alternating teeth project more on one side than the other, so you would have to make sure that the reference plane used was hitting the correct teeth or you would be building a "heel" into the alignment. Aligning on the face of the plate as per EZ's instructions is the most practical way to get the required alignment. As far as the projection of the teeth past the plane of the plate, this is what determines the kerf as opposed to the plate thickness. You can estimate the projection of the carbide by subtracting the plate thickness from the kerf and dividing by two - this will not be constant from one blade brand/type to the other, and you can understand this when you look at different brands (and quality levels) of blades, some have very minimal projection of the carbide (these are typically blades which cannot be resharpened) whereas blades which can be sharpened will have substantially more carbide. Staying with the same blade brand/type should give a constant cut line, but realize that a blade that has been sharpened will have a (relatively small) difference in the cut line because of the reduction in the thickness of the carbide when it was sharpened. If you switch blades on your saw depending on the material being cut, the solution is to have one ACE on your track mated to the fine tooth blade used for plywood, and the other to the coarser blade used for ripping wood - and mark them so they don't get mixed up.
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