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  #1  
Old 08-22-2017, 07:21 PM
MHB MHB is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Jennings, LA
Posts: 18
Default Anti Chip Edge

Perhaps someone can help me out. Im just starting out with a single 54 track that I just purchased through Rockler. The anti chip edge was somewhat difficult to install, but it did slide in all the way. I took a light climb cut on the strip and then cut it again deeper. All seemed well I had clean edges on both sides of the cut tops and bottoms. All I was doing was making some practice cuts and the next thing I know, the strip was pulled quite a ways through the guide and ruined.

Ive looked at putting a #12 round head sheet metal screw in the holes at the end of the strip. I thought that I would ask what I might have done wrong before I ruin another strip.

Thanks,
Mike
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  #2  
Old 08-22-2017, 07:37 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: nyc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MHB View Post
Perhaps someone can help me out. Im just starting out with a single 54 track that I just purchased through Rockler. The anti chip edge was somewhat difficult to install, but it did slide in all the way. I took a light climb cut on the strip and then cut it again deeper. All seemed well I had clean edges on both sides of the cut tops and bottoms. All I was doing was making some practice cuts and the next thing I know, the strip was pulled quite a ways through the guide and ruined.

Ive looked at putting a #12 round head sheet metal screw in the holes at the end of the strip. I thought that I would ask what I might have done wrong before I ruin another strip.

Thanks,
Mike

Not your fault. They move around. Maybe humidity, temperature, manufacturing tolerance? Can't rely on them for cut line so make sure you mark it another way. Eventually, you might just remove it
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  #3  
Old 08-22-2017, 07:55 PM
MHB MHB is offline
 
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Thanks - not what I wanted to hear. Not why I bought this system. Not happy.
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  #4  
Old 08-22-2017, 08:37 PM
tofu tofu is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: nyc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MHB View Post
Thanks - not what I wanted to hear. Not why I bought this system. Not happy.
Note that it is only my opinion. Maybe it is dead on for others. But mine juts out more or less depending on pressure against the surface.

The track itself is great
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  #5  
Old 08-22-2017, 10:54 PM
Dino Dino is offline
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Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Edison NJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MHB View Post
Thanks - not what I wanted to hear. Not why I bought this system. Not happy.
If the edge is broken you can ask for a free replacement..one time only.
At least you get two edges instead of one and there many benefits that you will find. Like clamping very narrow pieces and have cleaner cuts do to spring action.
But the clamping action ( down pressure has to be the same)
You can crimp the edges in 4 places and they will stay put.
( only the round portion)
welcome to ez.
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  #6  
Old 08-23-2017, 10:41 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Posts: 1,245
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I've put sheet metals screws in the ends of the anti chip edges, works great to keep the edges from sliding out of the tracks. Lots of posts on this forums about users issues with the edges and different solutions, it's well worth spending some time reading them. I'm not a fan of the edges, I understand the concept and it's a clever idea, but in my experience they move around too much. I think a solid edge would be an improvement.
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  #7  
Old 08-23-2017, 10:49 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 655
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For some reason none of the edges worked as well as the originals (15 years ago???). I now do without ACE. Use a block with a groove to fit the rail and a nail to mark the blade edge.

Mike
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  #8  
Old 08-24-2017, 06:22 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Evans, GA
Posts: 1,604
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I too never use the ACE, have a device to align to either an inside or outside cut on the EZ-One. I just use the ACE with standalone tracks to straight edge or rough to size. Even the solid edges I have made eventually begin to align poorly given that the edge gets worn because of the lack of stability of the CS blade.
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  #9  
Old 08-24-2017, 12:56 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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Maybe what EZ should be looking at is ditching the anti chip edges and making a really nice cut line indicator, it should have adjustable pointers. And make a new insert for the saw Base that provides the anti chip protection. I just screw a block of wood, to the bottom of my Base, that the blade cuts through. What would be really cool is to do a 2 piece block so if it wears you could adjust them tighter to your blade, sort of like blade guides on a bandsaw.
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  #10  
Old 08-24-2017, 02:51 PM
philb philb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 164
Default Look at the weak link

In my opinion Dik had the key observation. The circular saw is the root of the problem. Having repaired circular saws, sold, sharpened, and replaced blades, and saw parts, I can state with a bit of authority -- the circular saw is your weak link. I have been surprised at the number of saw owners that never oil any part. I have seen jimmy rigged nut and bolt arrangements to hold the blade on the saw shaft. I have seen $4. blades purchased to build cabinets. At $150 a sheet for premium grade red oak veneer 3/4 inch plywood, and the cheapest blade available -- expecting a quality cut??

Depth of cut seems to be the big focus for many new EZ owners. Still the types of cuts I make the most frequently are well within the capabilities of EZ system. True I can not cut through a 4X4 post in single slice, but how often do I need to do that?

I ask you to consider the EZ system. What is really at fault? Consider putting a quality blade on the saw. If you need a flawless cut edge get a blade from Popular Tools, or a Tenryu. Freud Diablo is not a quality blade. Expect to spend over $100 for a blade. A blade that can be sharpened and last for many years. If you compare the carbide pads (tips) are noticeably larger and stronger than cheap carbide blades. If you were to compare the Popular Tools carbide to the cheaper blade carbide you will see the difference. If you put a cheap blade on the sharpening jig you will be shocked at how out of round the blades are. I have eaten potato chips that were flatter than some of the Irwin blades.

I admit my words are harsh. Please consider the saw and the blade before you blame the system. EZ can not control what saw you use. Neither can EZ control the type of blade you put on your saw. So I will state that in my opinion you do have control over the blade and that will make a big difference in the quality of cut. Also -- read your saw manual! I have been amazed at the number of tool owners that the manual is the first thing they toss out! The logical warning are the same; yes you know you can not operate your saw at the deep end of your swimming pool, even with a snorkel. Still the manual does tell you when and how to oil the saw. Use a compressor with clean air to blow out the saw dust. Sawdust keeps heat in the saw and heat is an enemy of any tool. On that point -- heat will damage the blade -- FAST! The tests that have been performed record the cutting edge of the carbide tips climb to 900 degrees! That will cause damage to a blade. Consider the type of grind you use on the saw blade. There is no such thing as one type does all. Melamine laminate over particle board. Your best cut is using an HATB (High Alternating Bevel) will be the cleanest cut. Not every sharpener can sharpen at the high angle required for HATB. TC (Triple Chip) is not as smooth or clean as the HATB but it will handle the high heat best of all the grinds. ATB or (Alternating Bevel) is nicest cut for quality wood veneer. ATB is the most common bevel you will find, but it is not universal. There are other grinds available but not needed for most of our woodworking. I have written extensively on the blade subject. You can look the posting up under both of my names philphoto or philb. If memory serves, the philphoto has the most pertinent information.

I guess that I have probably irritated enough nerves.
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