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  #1  
Old 06-10-2017, 01:42 PM
kenk kenk is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 283
Default EZ Tenon Joinery

I was reading about Festool Domino joiners and went to their web site and just shocked when I saw the asking price - $1000 or more!!

Then I found this article about a low cost alternative:

http://thecraftsmanspath.com/2007/09...estool-domino/

I immediately realized that the EZ Super Smart Router Kit with a plunge router could easily do this with correctly set X and Y limit stops. Add an appropriately sized upcut spiral bit - it wouldn't even have to be the full width - seems like it would work.

My thinking was you'd use the Festool Domino rather than try to make your own.

Of course you'd have to have the ability to fasten the material appropriately so it will behave with the SSRK. I haven't thought too much about those requirements.

Has anyone tried this?
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  #2  
Old 06-10-2017, 02:16 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Austin, Tx.
Posts: 900
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kenk View Post
I was reading about Festool Domino joiners and went to their web site and just shocked when I saw the asking price - $1000 or more!!

Then I found this article about a low cost alternative:

http://thecraftsmanspath.com/2007/09...estool-domino/

I immediately realized that the EZ Super Smart Router Kit with a plunge router could easily do this with correctly set X and Y limit stops. Add an appropriately sized upcut spiral bit - it wouldn't even have to be the full width - seems like it would work.

My thinking was you'd use the Festool Domino rather than try to make your own.

Of course you'd have to have the ability to fasten the material appropriately so it will behave with the SSRK. I haven't thought too much about those requirements.

Has anyone tried this?
I've done similar, altho I use dowels instead of tenons- bit quicker for me; that's what my shop is set up for.

Years ago, I made a couple of exterior cedar doors for a client. I needed to recess the cedar panels, so I did the setup and routing like you mentioned, w/the SSRK- same concept as doing mortise/tenon.

Pics show setting up on the outer edge of my PBB (which is simply a 'box' w/all sides being EZ track, bottom-side out); as well as the final product. Stiles and rails were then doweled together.

Having the PBB made the process quick and EZ for setup and actual routing. To hold and rout the longer pieces, I used slide-in extensions to the core PBB to increase its length.

Rick
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  #3  
Old 06-10-2017, 02:59 PM
philb philb is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 162
Default Joint and tool question

Using a tool you already own is a worthy goal and a valid line of thinking. The following is my pursuit of the same ends and my final choice.

I am with you on the $1000 investment being a shock. A few years ago I was exploring the same thing. Loose tenon, versus the standard mortise and tenon versus the. . . on and on. So many of the plans available called for strange dimension to account for the tenon and if you were a bit off on the tenon your work will show in out of square joints. So I went the direction of biscuit or loose tenon. The cutting dimensions were straight forward and without overage or having to account for the tenon. Still I was really bothered by having to buy more tools and learning the techniques of each tool and joint. Biscuits have their pluses and minuses, for installation and use, and required buying a biscuit cutter and biscuits. Loose tenons to my thinking were a better option. I have trust issues with biscuits when making doors of any kind. I like the thought of having more "wood" in the joint with a loose tenon. After playing around with some of the ideas for making loose tenons, including the Rockler loose tenon maker that was made with a drill and drilling jig. The tenons were to be purchased from Rockler and they looked like 4 dowels side by side joined as one piece. Then it struck me as odd, to be using a drill to make a loose tenon hole and buying special tenon pieces. Why not just use dowels? After reading several articles on dowels and their uses, I started looking for a better way to make the dowel joints. So about 8 years ago I came across the Dowelmax. I researched the Dowelmax and the possibilities for using it. I bought the entire system they make. I did not have to buy anything other than the Dowelmax and dowels. At that time it was $250 investment which is a bunch less than the biscuit, or loose tenon cutters. I had a very versatile jig for placing dowel joints, and the drills I already had a few of those. I have made joints in exterior doors, joined 16 foot 2 X 12" for a large sign job. Plus countless other small and large projects. I have not had a single failure or broken joint. I have misplaced a dowel hole -- the big plus with that is the repair -- just glue a dowel in place and redrill ! No other joint that I can think of has an easier correction.

I know there are other dowel jigs available. I can only speak to the Dowelmax. Another good testament to the Dowelmax -- try to find a used on on ebay. I look as an ongoing sort of test -- never have found anyone getting rid of their Dowelmax. That tells me that the dowel users are happy with their joints, happy with their Dowelmax, and the investment was worth it.

Perhaps some of the other dowel jig owners will jump in here? The key isn't as much the jig -- though a high quality jig is worth the money -- the issue is what type of joint, it's quality in use, and how much trouble is it to make. My bottom line is the other types of joints loose tenon, biscuit, mortise & tenon all required a substantial learning curve to use or install. Plus they all require a hefty investment. All of which brings us full circle to Kenk's original post -- getting on with a tool or jig you already have.
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  #4  
Old 06-10-2017, 09:14 PM
Tracedfar Tracedfar is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: Balko, OK
Posts: 225
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Yeah, +1 on the price of the Domino. If I were making a lot of furniture, I might be able to justify it because it is a very cool tool.

Until then, I really like my Jessem dowel jig. I have all three sizes: 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2". It's easy to set up, fairly versatile, and fast. The bits have adjustable collars so I can quickly set the depth as needed. Dowel placement is almost as easy as a biscuit joiner.

I've used it to build and repair all kinds of pieces where it was necessary to hide the joinery, primarily furniture.

It certainly wasn't the cheapest but it's exceeded my expectations in most every way.
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  #5  
Old 06-11-2017, 04:55 PM
Jeff Freelove Jeff Freelove is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Round Rock, Texas
Posts: 147
Default My 2 cents - Lamellos Rule!

My vote is for biscuits.

They offer:
Low cost ($.04-.06 each in a quantity of 1000 biscuits)
Some vertical and lateral movement (unlike dowels)
Fairly strong joints. I did a search a few years back and was surprised they were very close to dominos in some strength tests. FW #203 Joinery Shootout Jan- Feb 2009.

Dowels are not sexy and new but, in many applications they are stronger that Dominos. M/T joints are stronger too. Sometimes, I even skip the glue and go for pocket screws. They haven't failed me either. Heresy to be sure!

So far, none of my cabinet carcasses, cabinet doors, bed frames, or anything else I've assembled with biscuits have failed joints. I'm certain it would also be true if I used the much more expensive Domino tenons too.

Last edited by Jeff Freelove; 06-11-2017 at 04:57 PM. Reason: fat fingers
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  #6  
Old 06-11-2017, 05:04 PM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Evans, GA
Posts: 1,604
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Me, I'm for dowels. I love my JessEm, just wish I had waited a few years and gotten the new version so I could have 1/2" capability. I'm sold on the accuracy with which I can glue up panels. I use them for just about everything, even the line up door jambs and casings. Takes longer, but I'm retired so time I have.
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  #7  
Old 06-12-2017, 11:49 AM
roy_okc roy_okc is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Moore, OK
Posts: 247
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+1 on the previous model JessEm dowel jig. I don't use it often, but sure appreciate it when I do.

I've done up to 6 foot rows of dowels and had zero alignment issues.

I also rigged it to my SSRK when I needed to put some dowels down the center of a piece of plywood, again it was spot on for a several foot row with a dowel every 10 or so inches (around whatever the max that the jig could span).

JessEm is another brand that you rarely see used items on Craigslist or ebay. I also have the Incra version of their Mast-R-Lift II router lift, excellent and so accurate!
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  #8  
Old 06-12-2017, 11:55 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Good to hear Roy, I have that lifter on order, along with stuff to update my old INCRA positioner. Probably will move the old one to the EZ-One as a removable fence.
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  #9  
Old 06-12-2017, 02:57 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 654
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I'm an older EZ-Guy but I recently had two big projects: crib for our 1st granddaughter and a garden bench. I found a really good deal on a slightly used larger Festool Domino. I had to use my EZ-Ingenuity to build a couple of jigs but it sure made life easy on these two projects. The crib alone had something like 150+ mortises to machine. Only issue I had was that I had to make sure everything was perfect because the tenons were machined so quickly if there were any errors there would be lots of them.

Mike
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