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Old 05-25-2012, 01:51 AM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tulare, CA
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Default Any hvlp users out there ?

looking at getting my first set-up and wanted any advice you may have. I have been looking at the Fuji turbine systems as well as an hvlp conversion gun for my current compressor rated at (30 gal 6hp 8.6 scfm at 40 psi) I want to use the set-up for paint and applying finishes for my personal wood projects.

Rod
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Old 05-25-2012, 07:25 AM
Dik Harrison Dik Harrison is offline
 
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Rod,

I bought the Rockler unit some time ago and really enjoy using it. so far I have sprayed shellac based sealer, water based poly on door and window trim before installation, and exterior acrylic primer and enamel on the PVC window trim for the windows I'm replacing. I love it. Someday I might purchase a better unit, but this one works great for me.
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  #3  
Old 05-25-2012, 07:48 AM
Lex Lex is offline
 
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Location: Florida
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I bought the Earlex HV5500 at Woodcraft, and I really like it. If you have the bucks for a Fuji or Apollo system, by all means go for it. I'm on a budget and from the reviews that I read, the Earlex HV5500 is the best of the budget systems. I got orange peel the first time that I used it (because I didn't thin the enamel enough), but I've gotten great results every time since then. Practice helps. The only real negative thing about it is the air hose is a friction fit in the gun, and I've had it pop off a few times. I've gotten in the habit of checking the hose automatically now as I move around spraying. It's a minor annoyance, not a big deal. There are some videos on YouTube showing various sprayers in action. Just search for Earlex (or Fuji, etc.) HVLP and you'll find them easily.
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Old 05-25-2012, 08:13 AM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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I have the Fuji Q4 Pro system and love it. I got lucky and got a deal on it on CL. I have the air assisted gravity fed gun with fan adjustment on the gun. I spray WB coatings from Target.

Mike
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  #5  
Old 05-25-2012, 09:46 AM
Burt Burt is offline
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We've used a Sherwin Williams (Actually made by Graco) in the shop for years. It has always done a great job, is dependable and pretty user freindly. For commerical purposes they pay for themselves very quickly with the savings on the finish being sprayed.


Burt
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  #6  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:18 PM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Tulare, CA
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Thanks for the replies! I am not set on the fuji, but it was one system that had great reviews and some helpful youtube vids. I honestly want to keep the expense down. I just discovered that I may be able to use my compressor and a hvlp conversion gun. My local auto paint store showed me a devilbiss finishline gun that included 4 diff tip sizes that he thought would work great on wood projects. Approx $250 for the gun and another $100 for a filter system. (about half the cost of a Fuji Minimite 4) The Earlex system looks pretty nice too. I was surprised at all the great reviews on the Rockler system. For such a reasonable price you get tremendous bang for your buck. (It seems so rare these days)

Rod
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  #7  
Old 05-25-2012, 02:35 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
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I've a DeVilbess GTI, which is a gravity feed HVLP gun that runs off a normal air compressor. I think it's 30psi max in and that gets you 8psi at the tip. I think it was around $450 so it's mid spec. It's a nice gun and works well. My problem is I'm always looking for a conventional gun finish so I keep winding the air pressure up on my HVLP. Then I get good atomization and a nice finish, I also get about the same amount of overspray as a conventional gun.
If I leave the air pressure where it's supposed to be it's, an OK finish, a little orange peely, and application is a little slow.
I've only shot paint, might be different with lacquers.
Never used a turbine gun, it'd be fun to try
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  #8  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:33 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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Location: Austin, Tx.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ivanhoe View Post
looking at getting my first set-up and wanted any advice you may have. I have been looking at the Fuji turbine systems as well as an hvlp conversion gun for my current compressor rated at (30 gal 6hp 8.6 scfm at 40 psi) I want to use the set-up for paint and applying finishes for my personal wood projects.

Rod
For compressor driven hvlp, there is no gun like Lexaire's 2001 conversion gun. The pneumatic trigger makes it difficult to mess up. Smooth operating; consistent results; easy dismantling and cleaning. Totally worth the extra bucks.

Lexaire's turbine driven hvlp gun is great also. I have the Citation, 4 stage set-up using the Lexaire made-for-hvlp gun.

Fuji units are highly rated, as is the Accuspray hvlp gun.

I've been told that a good spray man, using a lesser gun, can do a better job than a novice using the best gun- practice makes perfect, in other words.
ymmv,
Rick
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  #9  
Old 05-25-2012, 05:58 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
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:
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean9c View Post
I've a DeVilbess GTI, which is a gravity feed HVLP gun that runs off a normal air compressor. I think it's 30psi max in and that gets you 8psi at the tip. I think it was around $450 so it's mid spec. It's a nice gun and works well. My problem is I'm always looking for a conventional gun finish so I keep winding the air pressure up on my HVLP. Then I get good atomization and a nice finish, I also get about the same amount of overspray as a conventional gun.
If I leave the air pressure where it's supposed to be it's, an OK finish, a little orange peely, and application is a little slow.
I've only shot paint, might be different with lacquers.
Never used a turbine gun, it'd be fun to try
Sean, for many years, I fought the same battle with my hvlp's. One day the painter on my bigger jobs was watching me paint. After seeing my 'close-but-not-quite-right' results, he suggested a couple of 'tricks' that work famously:
-thin the paint. 20%-40%. Really. I initially freaked out at that much thinner (lacquer thinner, not paint thinner). It totally 'soupifies' the paint. I thought it would make a mess, until he showed me the 2nd 'trick':
-initially spray a quick, thin coat, followed by a second, thicker coat. Don't be in too much of a hurry between coats- you want the first coat to 'flash-off' (have the thinner evaporate significantly) enough to allow it to bond with and 'hold' the second thicker coat.

Once you get the hang of it, your results will begin to look way better. It's the same technique that the car spraying guys do. Surprised me at how much better my results are, plus, I'm now spraying at lower pressures, like the hvlp is designed for.
oh, yeah.... to make it all work, make sure your fan tip is set wide. Too narrow of a fan concentrates too much paint in one area and doesn't break up the paint into fine enough droplets. As a general rule, too wide is way better than too narrow. And, with that wide fan, overlap each pass by one-half of the fan width.
Finish it off with some passes going crosswise to your initial spray direction to fill in any unseen voids. After a while, you'll get to where you can lay on the paint right up to the point where it's wanting to start running, but doesn't. Your neighbors will be jealous.
Maybe post us some good pics of your results?
Rick

Last edited by bumpnstump; 05-25-2012 at 06:03 PM.
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  #10  
Old 05-25-2012, 11:40 PM
sean9c sean9c is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,231
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
:

Sean, for many years, I fought the same battle with my hvlp's. One day the painter on my bigger jobs was watching me paint. After seeing my 'close-but-not-quite-right' results, he suggested a couple of 'tricks' that work famously:
-thin the paint. 20%-40%. Really. I initially freaked out at that much thinner (lacquer thinner, not paint thinner). It totally 'soupifies' the paint. I thought it would make a mess, until he showed me the 2nd 'trick':
-initially spray a quick, thin coat, followed by a second, thicker coat. Don't be in too much of a hurry between coats- you want the first coat to 'flash-off' (have the thinner evaporate significantly) enough to allow it to bond with and 'hold' the second thicker coat.

Once you get the hang of it, your results will begin to look way better. It's the same technique that the car spraying guys do. Surprised me at how much better my results are, plus, I'm now spraying at lower pressures, like the hvlp is designed for.
oh, yeah.... to make it all work, make sure your fan tip is set wide. Too narrow of a fan concentrates too much paint in one area and doesn't break up the paint into fine enough droplets. As a general rule, too wide is way better than too narrow. And, with that wide fan, overlap each pass by one-half of the fan width.
Finish it off with some passes going crosswise to your initial spray direction to fill in any unseen voids. After a while, you'll get to where you can lay on the paint right up to the point where it's wanting to start running, but doesn't. Your neighbors will be jealous.
Maybe post us some good pics of your results?
Rick
Everything varies with the paint you're spraying, I've even had brands of paint where different colors had to be thinned differently. I've thinned some easily 40% to about the consistency of milk. Seems weird but that's what works. Used naphtha to thin the first coat, naphtha evaporate very quickly but because it evaps so fast there's no time for the paint to flow, then when the first coat has flashed off spray the second coat using a slower thinner. Spraying on to the tacky first coat gives the second coat something to hang to and the slower thinner gives it time to flow.
I've noticed the same thing about the fan, narrowing it down just doesn't work.
All this talk of spraying makes me want to go find something to paint, not really, I've spent the last week sanding and varnishing some furniture I made. Put the 6th and hopefully last coat on this PM
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