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Old 07-25-2014, 08:03 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 482
Default Multi-function table cart ez version

Here's a video I saw a while back about the MFTC which impressed me with its small size and portability. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5YzIwK-g0E

Then John Gowrie made one and posted here and made it seem more doable:
http://tracksawforum.com/showpost.ph...7&postcount=20

So I decided to try and ordered the plans (in metric sized for imperial dimensioned plywood-not imperial measurements for the parts). I had some SME that I got and never used, so I plan to use it around the edges of the top so I can incorporate eurekazone things with them. I thought I'd post the process here as it goes along.

I'm making two since I had a lot of scrap/salvage stuff that I wanted to use up and figuring out how to do a thing and setup is the most time consuming part. Plus gang cutting makes it even easier to cut most parts.
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Last edited by Goblu; 07-25-2014 at 10:16 PM.
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Old 07-25-2014, 08:30 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
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Default Gang cutting parts

One of the advantages of the EZ One is gang-cutting parts. Here are some pictures of parts being cut to length. In the past I've used a miter saw and done one at a time for this process. Much more time consuming and less safe than the track saw with a setup like the EZ One.

Photo one shows parts lined up to be cut to length. In the back you can see a fence, an aluminum bar secured with two ez smart clamps. The distance between this and the saw cutline along the track (at bottom) is the length of the parts. On the left are some stops that trap the parts and keep them square. You could use the long stops instead. I checked to make sure this was all square so the parts would come out square. In this case it was easy to do.

Photo two shows The parts right after they've been cut. Since I use an insert in place of the ACE, you can see it more clearly.

Photo three shows the parts after cutting.
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Last edited by Goblu; 07-25-2014 at 08:45 PM. Reason: add photos
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Old 07-25-2014, 09:18 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
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Default Jessem Mortise Mill for mortising legs and the ez one

One of the things that puzzled me was how to make the mortises in the eight legs (about 100 total). They are made from 2x4s milled to size. Pine is the recommended material to keep this light and portable. The mortises further help that cause. I wanted to make mortises instead of drilling holes and I have a barely-used Jessem Zip Slot Mortise Mill which uses a regular drill and a special bit to make mortises. If you watch the instructions and try it, it's not that easy to make a bunch of slots because of the clamping they use. Very slippy and awkward. (Why it's been barely used by me). This was a discontinued item when I got it, so why didn't it sell? I think the problem is that they never demonstrated/developed an adquate clamping system for it. Here's a video for anyone that's curious. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VtVGnxlBrc It works pretty well once securing it is solved. The EZ One made it work really great! With little setup and effort.

It seemed ideal for this job if I could figure out how to secure it and also raise the leg to sit tight against the Mortise Mill. Instead of trying to secure it in the way they demonstrate, I secured the Mill to the EZ One side (SSME using the top slot) with some bolts and knobs. I could then "raise" the top by adding/shimming various thicknesses of wood under the leg. It made it quite easy and accurate. I just slid each leg to make a mortise, then slid it to make the next. Referencing off both surfaces of the mill made it very accurate and relatively quick. One secret (for any Jessem mortise mill users) is not to use the back and forth technique they demonstrate in their video but instead drill a series of holes 1/4 in apart then go back and forth a couple of times to clean the edges.

And hey, this is one place where it excelled over the Domino. I don't own a Domino but sometimes have use of one, however the Domino does not go deep enough to make these mortises, so you have to do one side, then the other. That doubles the number of mortises. The drill bit for the Jessem is quite long and does pretty deep mortises. I did have to do this on one dimension of the legs since the front legs are wider (thicker than the other dimensions.) The Domino of course has other areas where it excels.

Picture 1-Jessem mortise mill set up with leg under it. You can see the sacrificial wood that holds it tightly upward against the mortise mill. No fumbling with the clamps to get each one set up. It's backwards from the Jessem video demo, but that was not a problem and allowed the wood to be supported on the EZ One.
Picture 2- a better shot of how it's attached to the table with a finished leg next to it.
Picture 3-close up of attachment to the EZ One. You can see sacrificial ply with leg on top.
Picture 4-finished mortises in all eight legs (whew!)
Picture 5-side of leg showing mortises on both sides

Edited to add: Dust collection on the mortise mill is absolutely wonderful! Hardly any dust at all. One advantage over a router.

Another edit: I made one set of mortises too high on the leg. It's not on the hinge side, but next to it, so when it came time to route to inset the hinge, I realized it would be too weak. I just glued a loose tenon in it to stabilize the wood. Doesn't look pretty, but it works. So, if you make this, don't put mortises too high. Mine are longer than need be, and if I were doing it a again, I'd make them shorter. One disadvantage of not being tuned in to the metric system. I'm better at it now that I've made these mistakes.
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Last edited by Goblu; 08-09-2014 at 01:39 AM. Reason: add photos
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Old 07-25-2014, 11:37 PM
bumpnstump bumpnstump is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goblu View Post
It works pretty well once securing it is solved. The EZ One made it work really great! With little setup and effort.

It seemed ideal for this job if I could figure out how to secure it and also raise the leg to sit tight against the Mortise Mill. Instead of trying to secure it in the way they demonstrate, I secured the Mill to the EZ One side (SSME using the top slot) with some bolts and knobs. I could then "raise" the top by adding/shimming various thicknesses of wood under the leg. It made it quite easy and accurate. I just slid each leg to make a mortise, then slid it to make the next. Referencing off both surfaces of the mill made it very accurate and relatively quick.
Katie...... I'm worn out just looking at all of those mortises! Glad it was you drilling 'em, and not me.....

Neat jessem jig- I'd not seen that before. I see what you mean re. the clamping- not the best, but it looks like you easily fixed that. The harder part, for me, would have been getting the leg material up where it was supposed to be. At about 2:20 in the vid, there's a great shot of the area where the material goes. In that shot, it shows 4 slots for bolt heads..... perhaps you could build a small, adjustable 'table' to attach to the lower slot(s) that would allow you to quickly place new material in place and hold it there while you did a firmer clamp? Or, something along those lines.

Looks like you've got a head of steam going re. this project; thanks for the pictorial progress report- I look forward to the final product.
Rick
ps great write-ups, too; the attention to detail is nice....
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Old 07-26-2014, 12:49 AM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Location: Michigan
Posts: 482
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Originally Posted by bumpnstump View Post
Katie...... I'm worn out just looking at all of those mortises! Glad it was you drilling 'em, and not me.....

Neat jessem jig- I'd not seen that before. I see what you mean re. the clamping- not the best, but it looks like you easily fixed that. The harder part, for me, would have been getting the leg material up where it was supposed to be. At about 2:20 in the vid, there's a great shot of the area where the material goes. In that shot, it shows 4 slots for bolt heads..... perhaps you could build a small, adjustable 'table' to attach to the lower slot(s) that would allow you to quickly place new material in place and hold it there while you did a firmer clamp? Or, something along those lines.
Yes, I don't want to give up on it. It is one of the most beautifully machined things you ever saw. Completely aircraft grade aluminum, wonderful precision, things fit together perfectly, great scales, etc. excellent repeatability. Amazing dust collection. Built to last forever.

I like the idea of a sliding table, I thought of something like a bridge that moves up and down. I did some shimming of sacrificial boards on top of my EZ one and that worked for this project, but a table would be even more versatile. Though I'd want the table to clamp slightly, too, since that keeps it from sliding around even after clamping, which was one of the problems. The downward/sideways pressure on the drill with nothing under it. Maybe something like a bridge.

For the vertical pieces, if I ever want to use it for mortise and tenon joinery, I'd need to figure that out, too. Jessem will likely to continue to offer drill bits, etc. from what I understand.

Yeah, the 100+ mortises built some upper arm strength (aka sore muscles) from holding the drill and clamping . I liked the idea of building two of these tables with gang cutting and all, but began to question the wisdom of this half way through the mortise drilling.

I have the carcases in a different location, with finish/paint drying on them. When I go there, I'll get pictures and make another post. I've cut plywood sides for the top, now to figure out how to assemble them so I can attach the SME extrusions and they will still fold up like they are supposed to.
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Last edited by Goblu; 07-26-2014 at 02:16 AM.
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  #6  
Old 07-29-2014, 10:57 PM
Goblu Goblu is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
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Wink Ironing the wood

Do you iron your wood with a steam iron?

I tried this, which I'd read about and wanted to try. I used a steam iron on the legs with all the mortises to get out some of the dents caused by clamps. Pine is really soft (spf 2x4's)!

I took pictures of one example where it worked well and a second where it didn't work as well, but improved things slightly. Kind of hard to see the dents. The first pic is a steam iron sitting on the wood. I didn't leave it on the wood for the process, just so I could take a pic. It goes quickly, you don't have to hold it still over the dents for very long if at all. I'll try this on better pieces now that I've experimented and can see it didn't damage the wood or even raise the grain. I think it kind of smoothed out the wrinkles in the wood . Probably depends on the type of wood though.

No one irons much anymore, so anyone could find a used iron in good condition. I mostly use this iron for veneer shelf edging, but don't add any steam for that.
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Last edited by Goblu; 07-29-2014 at 11:00 PM. Reason: add pictures
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