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Old 03-05-2012, 01:59 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Default Hilti WSC-267E Hypoid Saw

Ok Folks, here are my impressions of the Hilti WSC-267E. First off, I’m going to say that this saw is no longer sold in North America. It can still be found on e-Bay and Craigslist. This saw is still sold in Europe in the 110volt configuration as the WSC-265. As best as I can tell, it is nearly identical, except the WSC-265 also includes a riving knife.

The WSC-267E is a blade-right, hypoid-drive circular saw, manufactured in Liechtenstein for Hilti. Basically, it is a VERY high quality hand held circular saw that is designed to be compatible with use on the common track saw aluminum extrusion used by Hilti, Festool, and Makita. This saw retailed for roughly $350, and can be purchased on e-Bay for between $150-$250, depending on condition and shipping details. Parts are still available. This saw uses the common 7.25” saw blades with 5/8” arbor. Below I will list some of the great features of this saw.

The first thing you notice when you pick up the saw is the double-finger trigger and thumb activated safety switch. I have come to have a tremendous appreciation for ergonomics on tools, and for certain tools a two finger trigger is a HUGE plus! The handle layout (double finger trigger with thumb actuated safety) is nearly identical to my Festool KS-120 miter saw, so holding the Hilti saw felt very natural. The two fingered trigger is very comfortable, particularly when using the saw for extended periods. However, with a two finger trigger you have fewer fingers to hold the saw. My guess is that is the reason why the saw also has a safety switch, to prevent accidental starts.

When you start the saw, you’ll immediately notice a pause before the blade comes up to full speed. This soft start feature serves multiple purposes. First of all, it helps to reduce the reaction torque normally associated with hypoid and worm drive saws. Second, it makes for a more pleasant saw to work with. Rather than a sharp, violent start, the saw feels more like it is spooling up. Even with the soft start, the blade still comes up to full speed within a second or so, so I do not feel that this feature interferes with speed or productivity.

This soft start feature is part of the variable speed electronics suite built into the saw. Just to the rear of the handle there is a dial marked 1-6. This dial allows you to adjust the blade speed to match the blades you are using and the material you are cutting. For instance, you would want to run the saw full speed when cutting plywood, but would likely want to turn the speed down to 2 or 3 for cutting thick steel to keep heat down, or when cutting concrete to control heat and dust generation. This electronics suite also helps the saw to keep the blade at a constant speed regardless of load, helping to produce a more consistent cut and prevent damage to the motor.
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:01 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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One feature that initially attracted me to this saw was its stability when cutting bevels and plunge cutting. Most traditional circular saws are designed for cutting free-hand. Therefore, when cutting at a bevel or a shallow cut it is not terribly important that the motor is laterally stable relative to the base. For instance, my Makita 5008 has two connecting points from the motor/blade housing to the saw base: a simple hinge at the front of the saw, and a moving arm at the rear of the saw that adjusts for depth.

However, when you affix the base to a saw track, you realize how much lateral slop there is in the plunge mechanism, and how much instability there is in the bevel lock. Plunge Saws, as produced by manufacturers such as Festool, Makita, Maffel, Bosch, Metabo, and others, are designed specifically for use on saw tracks, and therefore are designed for maximum stability of the motor/blade relative to the saw base. This is typically accomplished via front AND rear bevel locks, and a VERY heavy duty, miter-saw style plunge mechanism.

In the Hilti saw, it achieves stability through a unique design I’m going to call a “Stability Arch”. This piece runs from the front of the saw to the rear, and is connected to the saw base plate at three points, two in the front and one at the rear. This allows this Stability Arch to have a great deal of stability relative to the base plate. This limits lateral movement when plunging, and provides great stability when making bevel cuts, and is complemented by front and rear bevel locks.

The bevel scale is marked in 1 degree increments from 0-45 degrees. This makes it very fast and easy to make rapid, precise bevel adjustments. The saw also features small set screws for fine tuning the saw. In a perfect world I would prefer that the saw could bevel to 47 degrees, but given the saws other strengths this is a shortcoming I can get past.

There is a handy depth scale on the rear of the saw. A REALLY handy detail on this saw is a depth limiting knob that allows you to limit the depth of cut. This is a GREAT feature!!! It allows you to make a plunge cut to a prescribed depth in much the same way that Plunge Saws do, with the benefit that there is no spring to fight and you can then lock the saw to that depth. BRILLIANT Hilti!!!

Another detail that assists in stable bevel cuts is that the front auxiliary handle is mounted on the saw base rather than the front of the saw motor. This allows you to place pressure on the base plate, preventing the saw from wanting to tip at extreme bevels.
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Old 03-05-2012, 02:04 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Another great detail of the WSC-267E is the integrated dust extraction. Dust extraction is always tricky. For maximum dust extraction, you would want to fully shroud the blade all the way down to the surface of the material you are cutting, which unfortunately would obscure your sight lines. I believe that Hilti has struck a nice compromise with the 267. Sight lines are pretty good, with good to great dust extraction. This is important for a saw that is intended for dual use (on-rail and free-hand).

The dust extraction is actually VERY similar to the Eurekazone dust extraction scheme, in that it collects dust directly above where the blade exits the material. The upper blade guard has a hole in it in the very front, a lit at the top and another slit at the rear of the upper guard. A black plastic dust shroud snaps over the top of the upper guard with a rear-facing dust port. This design is similar to mods some EZ users have adopted, with front dust extraction with rear-facing port. The dust port on the Hilti saw conforms to some sort of European standard that allows me to use my Festool D-27 hose without adapters.

There are many other details worth mentioning. The saw features a nice arbor locking lever that serves multiple purposes. First, it locks the arbor, and second, it locks out the trigger to prevent accidental start-ups during blade changes.

The saw also features a 12’+ VERY high quality cord, a MUST for breaking down sheet goods and a nice complement to common 12.5’ dust extraction hoses.

Finally, the saw base features a groove that allows users to use the saw on saw tracks from multiple manufacturers, including Hilti, Festool, Makita, and modified Eurekazone tracks, or on standard Eurekazone tracks using a Smart Base adapter.
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  #4  
Old 03-05-2012, 03:13 PM
TallJim27 TallJim27 is offline
 
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Wow! What a terrific review of the Hilti. (I can tell you don't like it at all...lol) Now I want one. Thanks for taking the time to enlighten us all.
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Old 03-05-2012, 03:42 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Hah-hah, thanks Jim!! The Hilti saw certainly isn't perfect, it just seems to be the saw best suited to my particular needs. Please let me know if there are design details or functional attributes you'd like me to elaborate on
Have fun and Stay Safe!!
Best,
Tom
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Old 03-05-2012, 04:00 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Something funny that I've noticed about the Hilti saws is that there seems to be two different versions of the Upper Blade Guard, specifically the blade viewing port on the left hand side, immediately behind the bevel scale. I own three WSC-267E saws.

Two of the saws have a sort of "grill" integrated into the window, and one saw the window is wide open.

The two saws that have the grill have serial numbers, the saw with the open window has NO serial #, the field is blank. Weird.....

Fellow Hilti owners, what are you seeing?
Best,
Tom
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Old 03-05-2012, 04:19 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Gensmer View Post
Something funny that I've noticed about the Hilti saws is that there seems to be two different versions of the Upper Blade Guard, specifically the blade viewing port on the left hand side, immediately behind the bevel scale. I own three WSC-267E saws.

Two of the saws have a sort of "grill" integrated into the window, and one saw the window is wide open.

The two saws that have the grill have serial numbers, the saw with the open window has NO serial #, the field is blank. Weird.....

Fellow Hilti owners, what are you seeing?
Best,
Tom
Mystery solved. Looked at mine and it has a grill but it is snap in. Part # 119 in the pdf parts diagram:

http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/page/m...tedOid=-116096

(no big deal - you are probably going to cover it with claear plastic anyway)

Mike
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Old 03-05-2012, 04:28 PM
Tom Gensmer Tom Gensmer is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Goetzke View Post
Mystery solved. Looked at mine and it has a grill but it is snap in. Part # 119 in the pdf parts diagram:

http://www.us.hilti.com/holus/page/m...tedOid=-116096

(no big deal - you are probably going to cover it with claear plastic anyway)

Mike
Ah, no Mike, the plot THICKENS! My two saws that already have grills, the grill is metal and is literally part of the upper guard, whereas my saw with no window must be designed to accept the clip-in guard you found on the parts list.

Another funny thing, the parts list I got from my local Hilti store does NOT list part #119 as found in the online parts list, it jumps from part 118 to 121. It looks like the online PDF form you linked is dated 20.10.2005, whereas the parts list I got from my Hilti store is dated 25.09.2006. Perhaps the early production runs had the open window, and later production runs the grill was integrated into the upper guard?.....

Weird, anyways, kinda fun to do some detective work!

Best,
Tom
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  #9  
Old 03-05-2012, 04:40 PM
Mike Goetzke Mike Goetzke is offline
 
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Mystery not solved? Your one saw not just missing the loose grill? Oh well, like I said no big deal, just cover it up.

Mike
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Old 03-05-2012, 04:47 PM
Ivanhoe Ivanhoe is offline
 
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great review Tom! I think Hilti would be proud.

If I see this correctly, you are eliminating the track on the top of the EZ rail, flipping it over and using track connector on the "bottom" of the rail?

Are you connecting the Hilti base to the track connector or do you have very long continuous connectors set for each length of EZ-rail?

Rod
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